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2017 Formula One season

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2017 FIA Formula One
World Championship
Previous: 2016 Next: 2018
Support series:
Sebastian Vettel is the current Drivers' Championship leader.
Mercedes are the current Constructors' Championship leaders. Pictured is the W08 EQ Power+, the car entered by the team in 2017.

The 2017 Formula One season is the 71st season of Formula One motor racing, it features the 68th Formula One World Championship, a motor racing championship for Formula One cars which is recognised by the sport's governing body, the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), as the highest class of competition for open-wheel racing cars. Teams and drivers are competing in twenty Grands Prix—starting in Australia on 26 March and ending in Abu Dhabi on 26 November—for the World Drivers' and World Constructors' championships.

As the reigning Drivers' Champion Nico Rosberg announced his retirement from the sport in December 2016, the 2017 season is the first since 1994 in which the reigning champion did not compete.[1] Mercedes started the season as the defending Constructors' Champion, having secured their third consecutive title at the 2016 Japanese Grand Prix.[2]

After seven races, Sebastian Vettel leads the World Drivers' Championship with 141 points, with Lewis Hamilton second with 129 points, and Valtteri Bottas third with 93 points. In the World Constructors' Championship, Mercedes leads with 222 points, with Ferrari second with 214 points, and Red Bull Racing third with 112 points.

Teams and drivers

The following teams and drivers are taking part in the 2017 Formula One World Championship:

Entrant Constructor Chassis Power unit Tyres Race drivers Free Practice drivers
No. Driver name Rounds No. Driver name
Italy Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari SF70H[3] Ferrari 062[4] P 5 Germany Sebastian Vettel 1–8 N/A
7 Finland Kimi Räikkönen 1–8
India Sahara Force India F1 Team Force India-Mercedes VJM10[5] Mercedes M08 EQ Power+[6] P 11 Mexico Sergio Pérez 1–8 N/A
31 France Esteban Ocon 1–8
United States Haas F1 Team Haas-Ferrari VF-17[7] Ferrari 062[4] P 8 France Romain Grosjean 1–8 N/A
20 Denmark Kevin Magnussen 1–8
United Kingdom McLaren Honda Formula 1 Team McLaren-Honda MCL32[8] Honda RA617H[9] P 2 Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne 1–8 N/A
14 Spain Fernando Alonso 1–5, 7–8
22 United Kingdom Jenson Button 6
Germany Mercedes AMG Petronas Motorsport Mercedes F1 W08 EQ Power+[6] Mercedes M08 EQ Power+[6] P 44 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton 1–8 N/A
77 Finland Valtteri Bottas 1–8
Austria Red Bull Racing Red Bull Racing-TAG Heuer RB13[10] TAG Heuer[11][N 1] P 3 Australia Daniel Ricciardo 1–8 N/A
33 Netherlands Max Verstappen 1–8
France Renault Sport Formula One Team Renault R.S.17[13] Renault R.E.17[13] P 27 Germany Nico Hülkenberg 1–8 46 Russia Sergey Sirotkin
30 United Kingdom Jolyon Palmer 1–8
Switzerland Sauber F1 Team Sauber-Ferrari C36[14] Ferrari 061[15] P 9 Sweden Marcus Ericsson 1–8 N/A
36 Italy Antonio Giovinazzi 1–2
94 Germany Pascal Wehrlein[N 2] 1, 3–8
Italy Scuderia Toro Rosso Toro Rosso STR12[17] Toro Rosso[11][N 3] P 26 Russia Daniil Kvyat 1–8 N/A
55 Spain Carlos Sainz Jr. 1–8
United Kingdom Williams Martini Racing Williams-Mercedes FW40[19] Mercedes M08 EQ Power+[6] P 18 Canada Lance Stroll 1–8 N/A
19 Brazil Felipe Massa 1–8
Sources:[16][18][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28]

Team changes

  • The parent company of MRT went into administration in January 2017.[29] The administrators failed to find a buyer and the company collapsed later that same month,[30][31] ultimately closing down entirely in March.[32]
  • Sauber uses one year-old Ferrari power units in 2017, mirroring the arrangement between Ferrari and Scuderia Toro Rosso in 2016.[15]
  • Toro Rosso returned to using Renault power units in 2017, having used 2015-specification Ferrari power units in 2016.[11] The team had previously used Renault power units in 2014 and 2015 before the relationship between Renault and sister team Red Bull Racing broke down, prompting Toro Rosso to seek out an alternative supplier.[33][34]

Driver changes

Nico Rosberg (pictured left) retired from Formula One shortly after winning the 2016 World Drivers' Championship. His place at Mercedes was taken by Valtteri Bottas (right, pictured at the 2016 Malaysian Grand Prix).

Mid-season changes

Season calendar

Nations that are scheduled to host a Grand Prix in 2017 are highlighted in green, with circuit locations marked with a black dot. Former host nations are shown in dark grey, and former host circuits are marked with a white dot.

The following twenty Grands Prix are scheduled to take place in 2017:[51]

Round Grand Prix Circuit Date
1 Australian Grand Prix Australia Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit, Melbourne 26 March
2 Chinese Grand Prix China Shanghai International Circuit, Shanghai 9 April
3 Bahrain Grand Prix Bahrain Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir 16 April
4 Russian Grand Prix Russia Sochi Autodrom, Sochi 30 April
5 Spanish Grand Prix Spain Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona 14 May
6 Monaco Grand Prix Monaco  Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo 28 May
7 Canadian Grand Prix Canada Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal 11 June
8 Azerbaijan Grand Prix Azerbaijan Baku City Circuit, Baku 25 June
9 Austrian Grand Prix Austria Red Bull Ring, Spielberg 9 July
10 British Grand Prix United Kingdom Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone 16 July
11 Hungarian Grand Prix Hungary Hungaroring, Budapest 30 July
12 Belgian Grand Prix Belgium Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot 27 August
13 Italian Grand Prix Italy Autodromo Nazionale Monza, Monza 3 September
14 Singapore Grand Prix Singapore Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore 17 September
15 Malaysian Grand Prix Malaysia Sepang International Circuit, Kuala Lumpur 1 October
16 Japanese Grand Prix Japan Suzuka International Racing Course, Suzuka 8 October
17 United States Grand Prix United States Circuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas 22 October
18 Mexican Grand Prix Mexico Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez, Mexico City 29 October
19 Brazilian Grand Prix Brazil Autódromo José Carlos Pace, São Paulo 12 November
20 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix United Arab Emirates Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi 26 November
Source:[51]

Calendar changes

Changes

General changes

  • In September 2016, Liberty Media purchased a minority stake in the sport from CVC Capital Partners,[54] and completed the purchase ahead of the 2017 season,[55] with the long-term goal of adopting a model similar to that used by the U.S. National Football League and Major League Baseball, with teams entitled to purchase a stake in the sport.[56] The commercial operation of the sport underwent a restructuring in January 2017, with Bernie Ecclestone leaving his position as chief executive of Formula One Group after forty years in the role.[57] Former team principal Ross Brawn – who won World Championships with Ferrari and his own eponymous team – was appointed as Managing Director in Ecclestone's stead.[58]
  • With the acquisition of the sport by Liberty Media, teams were given more control over creating and uploading content to social media.[59] Under Bernie Ecclestone's previous management, all footage filmed in the paddock was automatically controlled by Formula One Management with tight restrictions on the release of content.
  • As a response to widespread changes in the technical regulations expected to increase cornering speeds by up to 40 km/h (24.9 mph), the FIA requested that every circuit on the calendar undergo revisions to update safety features.[60]

Technical regulations

New technical regulations led to a significant change in car design of the new 2017 cars (Renault R.S.17 pictured, bottom) compared to their 2016 counterparts (Renault R.S.16 pictured, top).
  • The technical regulations governing bodywork design were revised for 2017, with the objective of improving lap times by four to five seconds over the 2016 generation of cars.[61] These changes include:[62]
    • An increase of the overall width of the cars to 2,000 mm (78.7 in).[63]
    • Bodywork allowed to reach a maximum width of 1,600 mm (63.0 in).[63]
    • An increase of the width of the front wing to 1,800 mm (70.9 in).
    • Lowering the rear wing by 150 mm (5.9 in) and moving its position back by 200 mm (7.9 in).
    • Bigger and longer rear diffuser, now extending ahead of the rear axle.[63]
    • The leading edge of the barge boards being brought forward to allow teams more freedom in controlling airflow.
    • An increase of the width of the front and rear tyres (around 25% wider than previous tyres) to allow cars to generate more mechanical grip.[63]
    • The minimum weight of the car including the driver being raised by 26 kg to 728 kg, with teams allowed to use 105 kg of fuel to account for the increase in minimum weight.
  • 2017 saw teams adopt the "T-wing", a thin T-shaped wing mounted to the bodywork above and forward of the rear wing to generate additional downforce. Its creation prompted concerns about the use of moveable aerodynamic devices – forbidden under the rules – after several T-wings were observed to be vibrating during pre-season testing. However, the stewards chose to review the use of T-wings on a case-by-case basis rather than issue a technical directive.[64]
  • The token system used to regulate power unit development – where the power unit was divided into individual areas, and each area assigned a points value with development of these areas deducting points from a manufacturer's overall points quota – will be abandoned.[65]
  • Restrictions are to be placed on the dimensions, weight and the materials used to build each individual component of the power unit.[66]
  • Teams are restricted to four power units per season regardless of the number of Grands Prix in the season.[67] Previous seasons had included a provision for a fifth power unit if the number of Grands Prix in a season exceeded twenty; from 2017, this provision is to be abandoned.
  • The cost of a power unit supply is reduced by €1 million in 2017 ahead of a further reduction in 2018.[66]
  • Cameras will no longer be permitted to be mounted on stalks located on the nose of the car.[68]
  • Pirelli continued to be Formula One's sole tyre supplier in 2017, beating out a bid by Michelin to provide tyres for the series.[69] Continuing from previous seasons, the company offered a range of seven different tyre compounds, five for dry and two for wet conditions. While both wet compounds are available for every Grand Prix, only a choice of three dry compounds are made available to teams for a single race weekend,[70][71] as in the previous season, teams are allowed to choose ten out of thirteen sets of tyres for a race weekend freely from the three compounds made available by Pirelli. However, due to limited testing time for the new compounds during the winter break, Pirelli chose to provide teams with a mandatory number of sets for the first five races.[72]

Sporting regulations

  • Under rules introduced in 2015, grid penalties for exceeding a driver's quota of power unit components carried over from one race to the next if the penalty could not be fully served when issued. When this carry-over system was abandoned, teams could build up a reserve of spare components by introducing several at once while only serving a single grid penalty, from 2017, teams will only be able to use one new component over their quota per race, with any additional components incurring further penalties. This change prevents teams from "stockpiling" spare power unit components.[73]
  • Power unit suppliers will have an "obligation to supply", mandating that they supply power units to any team, should a team end up without an agreement.[65] The rule was introduced following the breakdown in the relationship between Renault and their customer teams Red Bull Racing and Scuderia Toro Rosso at the end of the 2015 season that left both teams in limbo until deals could be arranged.[74]
  • In the event that a race is declared wet and must start behind the safety car, the grid will follow normal starting procedures once conditions are declared satisfactory for racing. Drivers will line up on the grid for a standing start once the safety car pulls into pit lane, although any laps completed behind the safety car will count towards the total race distance.[75]
  • The FIA abandoned the rule governing driving standards under braking, in lieu of an all-encompassing rule against manoeuvres that could endanger other drivers.[76] The rule was introduced in 2016 amid criticism of Max Verstappen for his habit of changing direction before braking late to defend his position, which led to concerns that such aggressive defensive driving could trigger an accident.[77]
  • Starting from the Spanish Grand Prix, teams will be required to display a driver's name and racing number on the external bodywork of the car in such a way that they are clearly visible to spectators. Teams have the option to use the official timing screen abbreviation, such as HAM (Hamilton) or VET (Vettel).[78]

Results and standings

Grands Prix

Round Grand Prix Pole position Fastest lap Winning driver Winning constructor Report
1 Australia Australian Grand Prix United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Finland Kimi Räikkönen Germany Sebastian Vettel Italy Ferrari Report
2 China Chinese Grand Prix United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Germany Mercedes Report
3 Bahrain Bahrain Grand Prix Finland Valtteri Bottas United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Germany Sebastian Vettel Italy Ferrari Report
4 Russia Russian Grand Prix Germany Sebastian Vettel Finland Kimi Räikkönen Finland Valtteri Bottas Germany Mercedes Report
5 Spain Spanish Grand Prix United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Germany Mercedes Report
6 Monaco Monaco Grand Prix Finland Kimi Räikkönen Mexico Sergio Pérez Germany Sebastian Vettel Italy Ferrari Report
7 Canada Canadian Grand Prix United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Germany Mercedes Report
8 Azerbaijan Azerbaijan Grand Prix Report
9 Austria Austrian Grand Prix Report
10 United Kingdom British Grand Prix Report
11 Hungary Hungarian Grand Prix Report
12 Belgium Belgian Grand Prix Report
13 Italy Italian Grand Prix Report
14 Singapore Singapore Grand Prix Report
15 Malaysia Malaysian Grand Prix Report
16 Japan Japanese Grand Prix Report
17 United States United States Grand Prix Report
18 Mexico Mexican Grand Prix Report
19 Brazil Brazilian Grand Prix Report
20 United Arab Emirates Abu Dhabi Grand Prix Report

World Drivers' Championship standings

Points are awarded to the top ten classified finishers in every race, using the following structure:

Position 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
Points 25 18 15 12 10 8 6 4 2 1

In the event of a tie, a count-back system is used as a tie-breaker, with a driver's best result used to decide the standings.[N 4]

Pos. Driver AUS
Australia
CHN
China
BHR
Bahrain
RUS
Russia
ESP
Spain
MON
Monaco
CAN
Canada
AZE
Azerbaijan
AUT
Austria
GBR
United Kingdom
HUN
Hungary
BEL
Belgium
ITA
Italy
SIN
Singapore
MAL
Malaysia
JPN
Japan
USA
United States
MEX
Mexico
BRA
Brazil
ABU
United Arab Emirates
Points
1 Germany Sebastian Vettel 1 2 1 2 2 1 4 141
2 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton 2 1 2 4 1 7 1 129
3 Finland Valtteri Bottas 3 6 3 1 Ret 4 2 93
4 Finland Kimi Räikkönen 4 5 4 3 Ret 2 7 73
5 Australia Daniel Ricciardo Ret 4 5 Ret 3 3 3 67
6 Netherlands Max Verstappen 5 3 Ret 5 Ret 5 Ret 45
7 Mexico Sergio Pérez 7 9 7 6 4 13 5 44
8 France Esteban Ocon 10 10 10 7 5 12 6 27
9 Spain Carlos Sainz Jr. 8 7 Ret 10 7 6 Ret 25
10 Brazil Felipe Massa 6 14 6 9 13 9 Ret 20
11 Germany Nico Hülkenberg 11 12 9 8 6 Ret 8 18
12 France Romain Grosjean Ret 11 8 Ret 10 8 10 10
13 Denmark Kevin Magnussen Ret 8 Ret 13 14 10 12 5
14 Germany Pascal Wehrlein WD 11 16 8 Ret 15 4
15 Russia Daniil Kvyat 9 Ret 12 12 9 14† Ret 4
16 Canada Lance Stroll Ret Ret Ret 11 16 15† 9 2
17 United Kingdom Jolyon Palmer Ret 13 13 Ret 15 11 11 0
18 Sweden Marcus Ericsson Ret 15 Ret 15 11 Ret 13 0
19 Spain Fernando Alonso Ret Ret 14† DNS 12 16† 0
20 Italy Antonio Giovinazzi 12 Ret 0
21 Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne 13 Ret DNS 14 Ret Ret 14 0
United Kingdom Jenson Button Ret 0
Pos. Driver AUS
Australia
CHN
China
BHR
Bahrain
RUS
Russia
ESP
Spain
MON
Monaco
CAN
Canada
AZE
Azerbaijan
AUT
Austria
GBR
United Kingdom
HUN
Hungary
BEL
Belgium
ITA
Italy
SIN
Singapore
MAL
Malaysia
JPN
Japan
USA
United States
MEX
Mexico
BRA
Brazil
ABU
United Arab Emirates
Points
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Other points position
Blue Other classified position
Not classified, finished (NC)
Purple Not classified, retired (Ret)
Red Did not qualify (DNQ)
Did not pre-qualify (DNPQ)
Black Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Race cancelled (C)
Blank Did not practice (DNP)
Excluded (EX)
Did not arrive (DNA)
Withdrawn (WD)

Bold – Pole position
Italics – Fastest lap

Notes:

  • † – Drivers did not finish the Grand Prix, but were classified as they completed more than 90% of the race distance.

World Constructors' Championship standings

Pos. Constructor No. AUS
Australia
CHN
China
BHR
Bahrain
RUS
Russia
ESP
Spain
MON
Monaco
CAN
Canada
AZE
Azerbaijan
AUT
Austria
GBR
United Kingdom
HUN
Hungary
BEL
Belgium
ITA
Italy
SIN
Singapore
MAL
Malaysia
JPN
Japan
USA
United States
MEX
Mexico
BRA
Brazil
ABU
United Arab Emirates
Points
1 Germany Mercedes 44 2 1 2 4 1 7 1 222
77 3 6 3 1 Ret 4 2
2 Italy Ferrari 5 1 2 1 2 2 1 4 214
7 4 5 4 3 Ret 2 7
3 Austria Red Bull Racing-TAG Heuer 3 Ret 4 5 Ret 3 3 3 112
33 5 3 Ret 5 Ret 5 Ret
4 India Force India-Mercedes 11 7 9 7 6 4 13 5 71
31 10 10 10 7 5 12 6
5 Italy Toro Rosso 26 9 Ret 12 12 9 14† Ret 29
55 8 7 Ret 10 7 6 Ret
6 United Kingdom Williams-Mercedes 18 Ret Ret Ret 11 16 15† 9 22
19 6 14 6 9 13 9 Ret
7 France Renault 27 11 12 9 8 6 Ret 8 18
30 Ret 13 13 Ret 15 11 11
8 United States Haas-Ferrari 8 Ret 11 8 Ret 10 8 10 15
20 Ret 8 Ret 13 14 10 12
9 Switzerland Sauber-Ferrari 9 Ret 15 Ret 15 11 Ret 13 4
36 12 Ret
94 WD 11 16 8 Ret 15
10 United Kingdom McLaren-Honda 2 13 Ret DNS 14 Ret Ret 14 0
14 Ret Ret 14† DNS 12 16†
22 Ret
Pos. Constructor No. AUS
Australia
CHN
China
BHR
Bahrain
RUS
Russia
ESP
Spain
MON
Monaco
CAN
Canada
AZE
Azerbaijan
AUT
Austria
GBR
United Kingdom
HUN
Hungary
BEL
Belgium
ITA
Italy
SIN
Singapore
MAL
Malaysia
JPN
Japan
USA
United States
MEX
Mexico
BRA
Brazil
ABU
United Arab Emirates
Points
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Other points position
Blue Other classified position
Not classified, finished (NC)
Purple Not classified, retired (Ret)
Red Did not qualify (DNQ)
Did not pre-qualify (DNPQ)
Black Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Race cancelled (C)
Blank Did not practice (DNP)
Excluded (EX)
Did not arrive (DNA)
Withdrawn (WD)

Bold – Pole position
Italics – Fastest lap

Notes:

  • † – Drivers did not finish the Grand Prix, but were classified as they completed more than 90% of the race distance.

Notes

  1. ^ Red Bull Racing uses Renault R.E.17 power units. For sponsorship purposes, these engines are rebadged as "TAG Heuer".[12]
  2. ^ Pascal Wehrlein was entered for the Australian Grand Prix but withdrew after taking part in Friday practice.[16]
  3. ^ Scuderia Toro Rosso uses Renault R.E.17 power units. For sponsorship purposes, these engines are rebadged as "Toro Rosso".[18]
  4. ^ In the event that two or more drivers achieved the same best result an equal number of times, their next-best result would be used, and so on. If two or more drivers achieved equal results an equal number of times, the FIA would have nominated the winner according to such criteria as it thought fit.[79]

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