FIS Alpine World Ski Championships

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FIS Alpine World Ski Championships
FIS World Ski Championships Gold Medal.jpg
gold medal
Status active
Genre sporting event
Date(s) January–February
Frequency biannual
Location(s) various
Inaugurated 1931 (1931)
Organised by FIS

The FIS Alpine World Ski Championships are organized by the International Ski Federation (FIS).

History[edit]

The first world championships in alpine skiing were held in 1931, during the 1930s, the event was held annually in Europe, until interrupted by the outbreak of World War II, preventing a 1940 event. An event was held in 1941, but included competitors only from nations from the Axis powers or nations not at war with them, the results were later cancelled by the FIS in 1946 because of the limited number of participants, so they are not considered official.[1]

Following the war, the championships were connected with the Olympics for several decades, from 1948 through 1982, the competition was held in even-numbered years, with the Winter Olympics acting as the World Championships through 1980, and a separate competition held in even-numbered non-Olympic years. The 1950 championships in the United States at Aspen were the first held outside of Europe and the first official championships separate of the Olympics since 1939.

The combined event was dropped after 1948 with the addition of the giant slalom in 1950, but returned in 1954 as a "paper" race which used the results of the three events: downhill, giant slalom, and slalom. During Olympic years from 1956 through 1980, FIS World Championship medals were awarded in the combined, but not Olympic medals, the combined returned as a separately run event in 1982 with its own downhill and two-run slalom, and the Super-G was added to the program in 1987. (Both were also added to the Olympics in 1988.)

There were no World Championships in 1983 or 1984 and since 1985, they have been scheduled in odd-numbered years, independent of the Winter Olympics. A lack of snow in southern Spain in 1995 caused a postponement to the following year.

The 2015 FIS Alpine World Ski Championships were held in the United States, Vail and Beaver Creek Colorado were the host cities, the 2017 FIS Alpine World Ski Championships will be held in St. Moritz, Switzerland.

Hosts[edit]

Year Place Country Event Official FIS designation[2]
1931 Mürren    Switzerland FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1931   1st Alpine World Ski Championships
1932 Cortina d'Ampezzo  Italy FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1932 2nd Alpine World Ski Championships
1933 Innsbruck  Austria FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1933 3rd Alpine World Ski Championships
1934 St. Moritz    Switzerland FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1934 4th Alpine World Ski Championships
1935 Mürren    Switzerland FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1935 5th Alpine World Ski Championships
1936 Innsbruck  Austria FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1936 6th Alpine World Ski Championships
1937 Chamonix  France FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1937 7th Alpine World Ski Championships
1938 Engelberg    Switzerland FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1938 8th Alpine World Ski Championships
1939 Zakopane  Poland FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1939 9th Alpine World Ski Championships
1941 Cortina d'Ampezzo  Italy FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1941 none[1]
1948 St. Moritz    Switzerland 1948 Winter Olympics 10th Alpine World Ski Championships
1950 Aspen, CO  United States FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1950 11th Alpine World Ski Championships
1952 Oslo  Norway 1952 Winter Olympics 12th Alpine World Ski Championships
1954 Åre  Sweden FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1954 13th Alpine World Ski Championships
1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo  Italy 1956 Winter Olympics 14th Alpine World Ski Championships
1958 Badgastein  Austria FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1958 15th Alpine World Ski Championships
1960 Squaw Valley, CA  United States 1960 Winter Olympics 16th Alpine World Ski Championships
1962 Chamonix  France FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1962 17th Alpine World Ski Championships
1964 Innsbruck  Austria 1964 Winter Olympics 18th Alpine World Ski Championships
1966 Portillo  Chile FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1966 19th Alpine World Ski Championships
1968 Grenoble  France 1968 Winter Olympics 20th Alpine World Ski Championships
1970 Val Gardena  Italy FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1970 21st Alpine World Ski Championships
1972 Sapporo  Japan 1972 Winter Olympics 22nd Alpine World Ski Championships
1974 St. Moritz    Switzerland FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1974 23rd Alpine World Ski Championships
1976 Innsbruck  Austria 1976 Winter Olympics 24th Alpine World Ski Championships
1978 Garmisch-Partenkirchen  West Germany FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1978 25th Alpine World Ski Championships
1980 Lake Placid, NY  United States 1980 Winter Olympics 26th Alpine World Ski Championships
1982 Schladming  Austria FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1982 27th Alpine World Ski Championships
1985 Bormio  Italy FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1985 28th Alpine World Ski Championships
1987 Crans-Montana    Switzerland FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1987 29th Alpine World Ski Championships
1989 Vail, CO  United States FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1989 30th Alpine World Ski Championships
1991 Saalbach  Austria FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1991 31st Alpine World Ski Championships
1993 Morioka  Japan FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1993 32nd Alpine World Ski Championships
1996 Sierra Nevada  Spain FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1996 33rd Alpine World Ski Championships
1997 Sestriere  Italy FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1997 34th Alpine World Ski Championships
1999 Vail, CO  United States FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1999 35th Alpine World Ski Championships
2001 St. Anton  Austria FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2001 36th Alpine World Ski Championships
2003 St. Moritz    Switzerland FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2003 37th Alpine World Ski Championships
2005 Bormio  Italy FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2005 38th Alpine World Ski Championships
2007 Åre  Sweden FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2007 39th Alpine World Ski Championships
2009 Val d'Isère  France FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2009 40th Alpine World Ski Championships
2011 Garmisch-Partenkirchen  Germany FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2011 41st Alpine World Ski Championships
2013 Schladming  Austria FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2013 42nd Alpine World Ski Championships
2015 Vail/Beaver Creek, CO  United States FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2015 43rd Alpine World Ski Championships
2017 St. Moritz    Switzerland FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2017 44th Alpine World Ski Championships
Future events
2019 Åre  Sweden FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2019 45th Alpine World Ski Championships
2021 Cortina d'Ampezzo  Italy FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2021 46th Alpine World Ski Championships

List of host countries[edit]

A total of 12 countries have hosted the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships, including those which were shared with the Winter Olympics. All of the top-7 on the list of nations which have won FIS World Cup races have been selected as host at least twice. The World Championships have been held only once in the Southern Hemisphere, in 1966 in Portillo, Chile in August, the list is complete through 2017 and does not include the unofficial 1941 event:

Country World Championships hosted Earliest
year
  Latest  
year
Future
Total number Independent Shared with
Olympics
   Switzerland 9 8 1 1931 2017
 Austria 9 7 2 1933 2013
 Italy 6 5 1 1932 2005 2021
 United States 6 4 2 1950 2015
 France 4 3 1 1937 2009 2023
 Sweden 2 2 0 1954 2007 2019
 Germany 2 2 0 1978 2011
 Japan 2 1 1 1972 1993
 Poland 1 1 0 1939
 Chile 1 1 0 1966
 Spain 1 1 0 1996
 Norway 1 0 1 1952
Totals 44 35 9 1931 2017

Events[edit]

Event 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 85 87 89 91 93 96 97 99 01 03 05 07 09 11 13 15 17
Men's combined
Men's downhill
Men's slalom
Men's giant slalom
Men's Super G
Women's combined
Women's downhill
Women's slalom
Women's giant slalom
Women's Super G
Nations Team Event
Total Events 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 10 10 10 9 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 10 11 11 11 11

Note: The men's Super G in 1993 and the team event in 2009 were cancelled due to adverse weather conditions, and no medals were awarded.

Skiers with most medals[edit]

Participants with five or more medals (not including team events) at the Alpine Skiing World Championships are:[3][4]

Men[edit]

Name Country Total Gold Silver Bronze
Kjetil André Aamodt  Norway 12 5 4 3
Marc Girardelli  Luxembourg 11 4 4 3
Lasse Kjus  Norway 11 3 8 0
Pirmin Zurbriggen    Switzerland 9 4 4 1
Toni Sailer  Austria 8 7 1 0
Aksel Lund Svindal  Norway 8 5 1 2
Émile Allais 1  France 8 4 4 0
Gustav Thöni  Italy 7 5 2 0
Ingemar Stenmark  Sweden 7 5 1 1
Ted Ligety  United States 7 5 0 2
Marcel Hirscher  Austria 7 4 3 0
Rudolf Rominger 1    Switzerland 7 4 1 2
David Zogg 1    Switzerland 7 3 4 0
Benjamin Raich  Austria 7 2 4 1
Jean-Claude Killy  France 6 6 0 0
Stein Eriksen  Norway 6 4 1 1
Hermann Maier  Austria 6 3 2 1
Karl Schranz  Austria 6 3 2 1
Guy Périllat  France 6 2 3 1
Günther Mader  Austria 6 0 1 5
Bode Miller  United States 5 4 1 0
Anton Seelos 1  Austria 5 4 1 0
James Couttet   France 5 1 2 2
Otto Furrer 1    Switzerland 5 1 2 2

1 Note: Medals earned in the 1930s, when it was an annual event.

Women[edit]

Name Country Total Gold Silver Bronze
Christl Cranz 1,2 Germany Germany 15 12 3 0
Marielle Goitschel  France 11 7 4 0
Anja Pärson  Sweden 11 7 1 3
Annemarie Moser-Pröll  Austria 9 5 2 2
Tina Maze  Slovenia 9 4 5 0
Hanni Wenzel  Liechtenstein 9 4 3 2
Lisa Resch 1 Germany Germany 8 1 4 3
Erika Hess    Switzerland 7 6 0 1
Renate Götschl  Austria 7 2 3 2
Lindsey Vonn  United States 7 2 3 2
Käthe Grasegger 1 Germany Germany 7 0 1 6
Pernilla Wiberg  Sweden 6 4 1 1
Inge Wersin-Lantschner 1  Austria 6 3 3 0
Vreni Schneider    Switzerland 6 3 2 1
Annie Famose  France 6 1 2 3
Nicole Hosp  Austria 6 1 2 3
Janica Kostelić  Croatia 5 5 0 0
Trude Jochum-Beiser  Austria 5 3 2 0
Anna Fenninger  Austria 5 3 1 1
Anny Rüegg 1    Switzerland 5 2 1 2
Maria Höfl-Riesch  Germany 5 2 0 3
Frieda Dänzer    Switzerland 5 1 3 1
Marlies Schild  Austria 5 1 2 2
Mateja Svet  Yugoslavia 5 1 1 3
Nini von Arx-Zogg 1    Switzerland 5 0 4 1
Lara Gut    Switzerland 5 0 3 2
Julia Mancuso  United States 5 0 2 3
Anita Wachter  Austria 5 0 2 3

1 Note: Medals earned in the 1930s, when it was an annual event. 2 Note: Medals from the non-recognized 1941 championship not included

Skiers with most victories[edit]

Top 10 skiers who won more gold medals at the Alpine Skiing World Championships (including at team events) are:

Men[edit]

Rank Skier Country From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Toni Sailer  Austria 1956 1958 7 1 - 8
2 Marcel Hirscher  Austria 2013 2017 ** 6 ** 3 - ** 9 **
3 Jean-Claude Killy  France 1966 1968 6 - - 6
4 Kjetil André Aamodt  Norway 1991 2003 5 4 3 12
5 Gustav Thöni  Italy 1972 1976 5 2 - 7
6 Aksel Lund Svindal  Norway 2005 2013 5 1 2 8
7 Ingemar Stenmark  Sweden 1976 1982 5 1 1 7
8 Ted Ligety  United States 2009 2015 5 - 2 7
9 Marc Girardelli  Luxembourg 1985 1996 4 4 3 11
10 Pirmin Zurbriggen   Switzerland 1985 1989 4 4 1 9

Women[edit]

Rank Skier Country From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Christl Cranz Germany Germany 1934 1939 12 3 - 15
2 Marielle Goitschel  France 1962 1968 7 4 - 11
3 Anja Pärson  Sweden 2001 2011 7 * 2 * * 4 * ** 13 **
4 Erika Hess   Switzerland 1980 1987 6 - 1 7
5 Annemarie Moser-Pröll  Austria 1970 1980 5 2 2 9
6 Janica Kostelić  Croatia 2003 2005 5 - - 5
7 Tina Maze  Slovenia 2009 2015 4 5 - 9
8 Hanni Wenzel  Liechtenstein 1974 1980 4 3 2 9
9 Pernilla Wiberg  Sweden 1991 1999 4 1 1 6
10 Tessa Worley  France 2011 2017 ** 4 ** - 1 ** 5 **

* including one medal in the Mixed team event
** including two medals in the Mixed team event

Medals by country[edit]

The tables for both genders include medals won at the nine Winter Olympics from 1948 through 1980, though these were also World Championships. The mixed team events is not included for both genders, therefore there is special table for these team competitions. Also, there are two cumulative medal tables - the first one includes medals won at the nine Winter Olympics from 1948 through 1980, the second one don't includes these medals. All tables are current through 2017.

Men[edit]

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Austria 52 51 46 149
2    Switzerland 33 36 38 107
3  France 22 26 16 64
4  Norway 20 17 10 47
5  Italy 14 13 14 41
6  United States 13 5 11 29
7  Germany 8 12 17 37
8  Sweden 6 3 8 17
9  Luxembourg 4 4 3 11
10  Canada 3 3 4 10
11  Liechtenstein 1 5 4 10
12  Croatia 1 1 2 4
13  Spain 1 0 1 2
14  Finland 1 0 0 1
15  Yugoslavia 0 1 2 3
16  Japan 0 1 1 2
 Poland 0 1 1 2
18  Australia 0 0 1 1
 Slovenia 0 0 1 1
TOTAL 179 179 180 538

Women[edit]

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Austria 40 46 46 132
2    Switzerland 31 32 20 83
3  Germany 25 22 27 74
4  France 20 24 17 61
5  United States 13 20 21 54
6  Sweden 11 4 10 25
7  Canada 11 4 3 18
8  Italy 6 10 11 27
9  Slovenia 5 5 1 11
10  Croatia 5 0 0 5
11  Great Britain 4 4 3 11
 Liechtenstein 4 4 3 11
13  Norway 1 2 5 8
14  Yugoslavia 1 2 3 6
15  Czech Republic 1 1 2 4
16  Australia 1 0 0 1
17  Finland 0 2 2 4
18  Soviet Union 0 0 2 2
TOTAL 179 182 176 537

Mixed team events[edit]

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Austria 3 2 0 5
2  France 2 0 1 3
3  Germany 1 0 1 2
4  Sweden 0 2 3 5
5  Canada 0 1 0 1
 Slovakia 0 1 0 1
7    Switzerland 0 0 1 1
TOTAL 6 6 6 18

Total[edit]

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Austria 95 99 92 286
2    Switzerland 64 68 59 191
3  France 44 50 34 128
4  Germany 34 34 45 113
5  United States 26 25 32 83
6  Norway 21 19 15 55
7  Italy 20 23 25 68
8  Sweden 17 9 21 47
9  Canada 14 8 7 29
10  Croatia 6 1 2 9
11  Liechtenstein 5 9 7 21
12  Slovenia 5 5 2 12
13  Great Britain 4 4 3 11
 Luxembourg 4 4 3 11
15  Yugoslavia 1 3 5 9
16  Finland 1 2 2 5
17  Czech Republic 1 1 2 4
18  Australia 1 0 1 2
 Spain 1 0 1 2
20  Japan 0 1 1 2
 Poland 0 1 1 2
22  Slovakia 0 1 0 1
23  Soviet Union 0 0 2 2
TOTAL 364 367 362 1093

Total (not including 1948-1980 Winter Olympics)[edit]

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Austria 81 82 74 237
2    Switzerland 54 59 51 164
3  France 34 42 26 102
4  Germany 30 28 41 99
5  United States 22 18 28 68
6  Norway 20 18 14 52
7  Italy 17 20 21 58
8  Sweden 15 9 19 43
9  Canada 11 7 5 23
10  Croatia 6 1 2 9
11  Slovenia 5 5 2 12
12  Great Britain 4 4 3 11
 Luxembourg 4 4 3 11
14  Liechtenstein 3 7 5 15
15  Yugoslavia 1 3 5 9
16  Finland 1 2 2 5
17  Czech Republic 1 1 2 4
18  Australia 1 0 1 2
19  Poland 0 1 1 2
20  Slovakia 0 1 0 1
21  Japan 0 0 1 1
 Soviet Union 0 0 1 1
 Spain 0 0 1 1
TOTAL 310 312 308 930

See also[edit]

References and notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "FIS History". FIS-Ski. Retrieved 2011-11-15. 
  2. ^ "Alpine World Ski Championships". FIS-Ski. Retrieved 2011-11-15. 
  3. ^ "Podiums". FIS-Ski. Archived from the original on 2012-09-05. Retrieved 2011-11-15. 
  4. ^ "Podiums". FIS-Ski. Archived from the original on 2013-01-02. Retrieved 2011-11-15. 

External links[edit]