List of aqueducts in the city of Rome

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For an overview of ancient aqueducts outside Rome, see List of aqueducts in the Roman Empire. For a chronological listing of aqueducts in Rome from antiquity to present, see List of Roman aqueducts by date.

This page lists ancient Roman aqueducts in the city of Rome.

Introduction[edit]

In order to meet the massive water needs of its huge population, the city of Rome was supplied with 11 aqueducts. Their combined capacity was capable of supplying at least 1,127,000 cubic metres (nearly 300 million gallons) of water to the city each day mostly from the Anio and the Apennine Mountains, serving a million citizens. Detailed statistics for the city's aqueducts were logged around 97 AD by Sextus Julius Frontinus, the curator aquarum (superintendent of the aqueducts) for Rome during the reign of Nerva. Less information is known about aqueducts built after Frontinus.

These estimates may not have considered water loss. Modern engineers have questioned the validity of these figures and measured Anio Novus limestone deposits to estimate the average wetted perimeter and surface roughness corresponding to only 2/3 of the flow figure given below.[1]

Table[edit]

Aqueducts in Rome
Name Year begun Year completed Length
(km)
Height at
source (m)
Height in
Rome (m)
Average gradient
(%)
Capacity
(m³ a day)
Aqua Appia 312 BC 312 BC 16.5 30 20 0.06 73,000
Aqua Anio Vetus 272 BC 269 BC 64 280 48 0.36 176,000
Aqua Marcia 144 BC 140 BC 91 318 59 0.28 188,000
Aqua Tepula 125 BC 125 BC 18 151 61 0.51 18,000
Aqua Julia 33 BC 33 BC 22 350 64 1.32 48,000
Aqua Virgo 19 BC 19 BC 21 24 20 0.02 100,000
Aqua Alsietina 2 BC (disputed) 2 BC 33 209 17 0.59 16,000
(not drinkable)
Aqua Claudia 38 AD 52 AD 69 320 67 0.37 184,000
Aqua Anio Novus 38 AD 52 AD 87 400 70 0.38 189,000
Aqua Traiana 109 AD 109 AD 33 - - -
Aqua Alexandrina 226 AD 226 AD 22 - 50 - 120.000 to 320.000

See also[edit]



References[edit]

  1. ^ Sturgeon, Clair; Shidlauski, Kristina (2015). "Illinois team solves ancient Roman water supply mystery". CEE. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Fall 2015: 24.