Politics of San Francisco

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San Francisco County vote
by party in presidential elections
[1]
Year GOP DEM Others
2016 9.2% 37,688 84.5% 345,084 6.3% 25,772
2012 13.0% 47,076 83.4% 301,723 3.6% 12,996
2008 13.7% 52,292 84.2% 322,220 2.2% 8,353
2004 15.2% 54,355 83.0% 296,772 1.8% 6,338
2000 16.1% 51,496 75.5% 241,578 8.4% 26,712
1996 15.7% 45,479 72.2% 209,777 12.1% 35,129
1992 17.8% 57,352 72.4% 233,263 9.8% 31,592
1988 26.1% 72,503 72.8% 201,887 1.1% 3,004
1984 31.4% 90,219 67.4% 193,278 1.2% 3,475
1980 31.9% 80,967 52.4% 133,184 15.7% 39,877
1976 40.3% 103,561 52.1% 133,733 7.6% 19,594
1972 41.8% 127,461 56.1% 170,882 2.1% 6,427
1968 33.7% 100,970 59.2% 177,509 7.2% 21,468
1964 28.7% 92,994 71.2% 230,758 0.1% 156
1960 41.8% 143,001 57.8% 197,734 0.4% 1,484
1956 51.8% 173,648 48.0% 161,766 0.5% 1,553
1952 52.9% 198,158 46.0% 172,312 1.1% 4,230
1948 45.7% 160,135 47.8% 167,726 6.5% 22,848
1944 38.9% 134,163 60.5% 208,609 0.6% 1,959
1940 39.3% 122,449 59.5% 185,607 1.2% 3,822
1936 24.7% 65,436 74.0% 196,197 1.3% 3,368
1932 31.4% 70,152 64.6% 144,236 4.0% 8,809
1928 49.1% 95,987 49.4% 96,632 1.5% 2,849
1924 47.8% 73,494 6.4% 9,811 45.9% 70,615
1920 65.2% 96,105 22.1% 32,637 12.7% 18,708
1916 42.3% 63,093 52.5% 78,225 5.3% 7,834
1912 Not on ballot 48.4% 48,953 51.6% 52,195
1908 55.2% 33,184 35.4% 21,260 9.4% 5,680
1904 60.9% 39,816 27.6% 18,027 11.6% 7,584

Following the social upheavals of the 1960s, San Francisco became one of the centers of liberal activism, with Democrats, Greens, and progressives dominating city politics. This trend is also visible in the results of presidential elections; the last Republican to win San Francisco was Dwight Eisenhower in 1956. Although the fight between Democrats and Republicans has been unequal for the last forty years, it has become increasingly lopsided, with conservative commentators frequently attacking the city's politics using the ad hominem phrase, "San Francisco values".[2] In spite of its heavy liberal leanings, San Francisco has the highest percentage of "no party preference" voters of any California county.[3] Campaign corruption is monitored by the San Francisco Ethics Commission.

State and federal representation[edit]

In the California State Senate, San Francisco is in the 11th Senate District, represented by Democrat Scott Wiener. In the California State Assembly, it is split between the 17th Assembly District, represented by Democrat David Chiu, and the 19th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Phil Ting.[4]

In the United States House of Representatives, San Francisco is split between California's 12th and 14th districts, represented by Nancy Pelosi (DSan Francisco) and Jackie Speier (DHillsborough), respectively.[5] Pelosi was House Speaker from 2007 through 2011, when Democrats were in the majority, since then, she has held the post of House Minority Leader, a post she also held from 2003 to 2007.

Local politics[edit]

The city is governed by a Mayor and an 11-member Board of Supervisors, both elected using preferential voting, the current mayor is Ed Lee, who was appointed by the Board of Supervisors on January 10, 2011, after Gavin Newsom resigned to serve as Lieutenant Governor of California.

Voter registration statistics[edit]

Total population[6] 797,983
  Registered voters[7][note 1] 497,663 62.4%
    Democratic[7] 276,855 55.6%
    Republican[7] 42,922 8.6%
    Democratic–Republican spread[7] +233,933 +47.0%
    Independent[7] 8,918 1.8%
    Green[7] 8,215 1.7%
    Libertarian[7] 3,028 0.6%
    Peace and Freedom[7] 1,727 0.3%
    Americans Elect[7] 23 0.0%
    Other[7] 1,284 0.3%
    No party preference[7] 154,691 31.1%

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/
  2. ^ Garofoli, Joe (November 3, 2006). "Three Dirty Words: San Francisco Values". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved June 24, 2017. 
  3. ^ "Historical Voter Registration Statistics" (PDF). 15-Day Report of Registration for the November 6, 2012, General Election. Secretary of State of California. 
  4. ^ "Communities of Interest — County". California Citizens Redistricting Commission. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  5. ^ "California's 12th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 12, 2013. 
  6. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k California Secretary of State. February 10, 2013 - Report of Registration. Retrieved 2013-10-31.

Further reading[edit]