Prospect Point Observation Tower

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Prospect Point Observation Tower
Niagara Falls observatory tower.JPG
The observation tower in 2013
General information
Architectural style Modernist
Town or city Niagara Falls, New York
Country United States of America
Coordinates 43°05′11″N 79°04′06″W / 43.086442°N 79.068389°W / 43.086442; -79.068389Coordinates: 43°05′11″N 79°04′06″W / 43.086442°N 79.068389°W / 43.086442; -79.068389
Construction started 1958
Completed 1961
Renovated 2001
Cost US$1,250,000
Height 282 feet (86 m)
Technical details
Lifts/elevators 4
Website
http://www.niagarafallsstatepark.com/observation-tower.aspx
References
[1][2]

The Prospect Point Observation Tower (also known as the Niagara Falls Observation Tower[2]) is a tower located in Niagara Falls, New York, United States just east of the American Falls.

History[edit]

The area of the tower and Prospect Point was once known as the High Bank Industrial/Mill District, and hosted industrial use of the area from the 1870s to 1940s.[3]

The tower was originally built in 1961[1] and extensively refurbished between 2001 and 2003.[4] Improvements included a pre-cast concrete plank observation deck, an ornamental stainless steel deck railing system, improved high-speed elevators, new rest rooms, and a gift shop.[4]

Description[edit]

The tower, constructed of aluminum, glass, and steel, stands at 282 feet (86 m)[2] with the base at the bottom of the gorge. Visitors enter the tower at the ground level from Niagara Falls State Park,[1] it sees eight million visitors annually.

The Maid of the Mist loads at the base of the tower.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "History of Niagara Falls towers". Skylon Tower. Archived from the original on August 31, 2012. Retrieved October 22, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Prospect Point Observation Tower at Emporis
  3. ^ http://www.niagarafrontier.com/milldistrict.html
  4. ^ a b "Governor Announces Completion of Multi-Million Dollar Improvement at Scenic Niagara Falls State Park". NYS Office of the Governor. June 24, 2003. Archived from the original on October 3, 2006. Retrieved October 22, 2016. 

External links[edit]