SS Oshkosh Victory

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SS American Victory.jpg
VC2-S-AP2 type Victory ship
History
United States
Name: SS Oshkosh Victory
Namesake: Oshkosh, Wisconsin
Owner: War Shipping Administration
Operator: Mississippi Shipping Company
Builder: California Shipbuilding (Calship)
Cost: $2,619,724.00
Laid down: August 9, 1945
Launched: June 6, 1945 Los Angeles, California
Acquired: September 10, 1945
In service: 1945
Homeport: San Pedro, California
Fate: Scrapped 1992
General characteristics
Class and type: VC2-S-AP2 Victory Ship
Tonnage: 10,750 long tons deadweight (DWT)
Length: 455 feet
Beam: 62 feet
Draft: 28 feet 6 inches
Propulsion:
Speed: 17 knots
Range: 23,500 miles
Capacity: 500,000 cubic feet (approximate)
Complement: 62 United States Merchant Marine and United States Navy Armed Guard
Armament:

SS Oshkosh Victory was a Victory ship which entered service in the Pacific Ocean shortly after the end of World War II. The ship’s United States Maritime Commission designation was VC2- S- AP3, hull number 808 (V-808). The ship was built at the California Shipbuilding Yard (Calship) in Los Angeles, California and was delivered on September 10, 1945. SS Oshkosh Victory was the 808th of the new 10,500-ton class ships to be known as Victory ships. SS Oshkosh Victory was built in 96 days, under the Emergency Shipbuilding program.

Design[edit]

Victory ships were designed to replace the earlier Liberty ships, intended specifically for use in World War II. They were designed to last longer and serve the US Navy after the war. Victory ships were faster, longer, wider, and taller than their predecessors. Victory ships had a thinner stack set farther toward the superstructure, and a long raised forecastle.[1][2][3]

Commissioning[edit]

The SS Oshkosh Victory was laid down during World War II on June 6, 1945, after Victory in Europe Day but before the end of the Pacific War. Calship's 458th ship, she was named for the city of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, on August 9, 1945, Mrs. Hubert M. Walker, widow of a California building contractor, gave the ship her champagne christening. Miss Elizabeth Chapman of Hollywood was in attendance to represent the city of Oshkosh, the SS Oshkosh Victory entered service on September 10, 1945.[4][5] With the surrender of Japan on 15 August 1945, she was not needed to support a planned invasion of the Japanese main island (see invasion of Japan). [6]

Marshal Plan[edit]

The SS Oshkosh Victory was operated by the Mississippi Shipping Company as a United States Merchant Marine ship, she transported supplies to help war-torn nations under the Marshall plan in the Far East. The Oshkosh Victory's home port was Los Angeles.

On March 2, 1946, the SS Oshkosh Victory was damaged after hitting a mine in the Yangtze River, in China. No crew members were injured.[7][8][9]

After the war in 1948, SS Oshkosh Victory was laid up in Suisun Bay and later transferred to James River at part of the National Defense Reserve Fleet.

Korean War[edit]

SS Oshkosh Victory served in the U.S. Merchant Marine during the Korean War. Merchant Marine ships carried about 90 percent of the cargo delivered to the war zone. Between 18 November, 1950 and 23 December 1952, the SS Oshkosh Victory aided American forces engaged against Communist aggression in South Korea by transporting food, mail and other goods.[10][11] After the Korean War, she was returned to the National Defense Reserve Fleet.

Decommissioning and Disposal[edit]

In 1992, the SS Oshkosh Victory was scrapped at Alang, India.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National parks, Reading 2: Victory Ships
  2. ^ shipbuildinghistory.com, Victory ships
  3. ^ National Parks, Victory Ships
  4. ^ Cost of War-Built Vessels f
  5. ^ MARINERS, THE WEBSITE OF THE MARINERS MAILING LIST., VICTORY SHIPS
  6. ^ Daily Review from Hayward, California · Page 1, August 10, 1945
  7. ^ Chronological List of Ships Sunk or Damaged during 1946
  8. ^ Watson's Really Big WWII Almanac: Volume I, By Patrick Watson
  9. ^ WW 2 home ports
  10. ^ Korean War Educator, Merchant Marine, Accounts of the Korean War
  11. ^ Small United States and United Nations Warships in the Korean War, page 191, By Paul M. Edwards

Sources[edit]

  • Sawyer, L.A. and W.H. Mitchell. Victory ships and tankers: The history of the ‘Victory type" cargo ships and of the tankers built in the United States of America during World War II, Cornell Maritime Press, 1974, 0-87033-182-5.
  • United States Maritime Commission: [1]
  • Victory Cargo Ships [2]

Sources[edit]

  • Sawyer, L.A. and W.H. Mitchell. Victory ships and tankers: The history of the ‘Victory’ type cargo ships and of the tankers built in the United States of America during World War II, Cornell Maritime Press, 1974, 0-87033-182-5.
  • United States Maritime Commission: [3]
  • Victory Cargo Ships [4]