Stephen Turnbull (historian)

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Stephen Richard Turnbull (born 6 February 1948) is a British academic, historian and writer.[1][not in citation given] He is a specialist in military history, particularly that of Japan.

Turnbull attended Cambridge University where he gained his first degree. He currently holds an MA in Theology, MA in Military History and a PhD from the University of Leeds where he is a lecturer in Far Eastern Religions.

He was on the editorial board of the short-lived Medieval History Magazine (2003–2005), which was published in association with the Royal Armouries. He was a consultant for the widely successful PC game Shogun: Total War and also its well-received sequel Shogun 2: Total War, both products of Creative Assembly, as well as historical advisor on the severely panned Hollywood film 47 Ronin starring Keanu Reeves.[2]

Selected works[edit]

Journal articles[edit]

  • "Legacy of Centuries: The Walls of Constantinople", Medieval History Magazine (MHM), Issue 2, October 2003.
  • "Mongol strategy and the Battle of Leignitz 1241", MHM, Issue 3, November 2003.
  • "The Teutonic Knights' battle for Riga", MHM, Issue 6, February 2004.
  • "The Passing of the Medieval Castle", MHM, Issue 9, May 2004.
  • "St Catherine's Monastery: Sanctuary of Ages", MHM, Issue 11 July 2004.
  • "Fighting Cardinals: Henry Beaufort & Guiliano Cesarini", MHM, Issue 13, September 2004.
  • "A Tale of Two Cities: Siege success and failure at Constantinople and Belgrade", MHM, Issue 16, December 2004.
  • "The Blunted Arrowhead: The defensive role of the great medieval fortresses of Albania", MHM, Issue 17, January 2005.
  • "The Ninja: An Invented Tradition?", Journal of Global Initiatives: Policy, Pedagogy, Perspective, Vol. 9: No. 1, Article 3, 2014.

Honors[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Library of Congress (LOC), Turnbull, Stephen R.; Virtual International Authority File (VIAF), Turnbull, Stephen R.; retrieved 2012-10-19.
  2. ^ "Dr Turnbull Profile". University of Leeds. Retrieved 2011-12-06. 
  3. ^ Turnbull, Stephen. (2005). Samurai Commanders, p. 2.

External links[edit]