USNS Dalton Victory (T-AK-256)

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USNS Dalton Victory (T-AK-256).jpg
History
United States
Name: Dalton Victory
Namesake: Dalton, Georgia - Dalton, Ohio
Owner: War Shipping Administration (1944-1950)
Operator: Sudden & Christenson inc. (1944-1946), Moore McCormack Lines, Inc. (1946-1947)
Ordered: as type (VC2-S-AP3) hull, MCV hull 21
Builder: California Shipbuilding Corporation, Los Angeles, California
Laid down: 8 April 1944, as SS Dalton Victory
Launched: 6 June 1944
Completed: 19 July 1944
Acquired: 2 April 1948, by the US Army Transportation Service
Renamed: USNS Dalton Victory (T-AK-256)
Reclassified: MSTS
Identification: Hull symbolVC2- S- AP3, hull number 21
Fate: Transferred to US Navy 8 August 1950
History
United States
Name: USNS Sunnyvale (T-AGM-5) 27 October 1960
Namesake: Sunnyvale, California
Owner: U.S. Navy (1950-1960)
Operator: U.S. Navy (1950-1960)
Acquired: US Navy 8 August 1950
Reclassified: 27 October 1960 as USNS Sunnyvale (T-AGM-5)
Struck: 15 December 1974
Identification:
Fate: sold for scrapping, 17 July 1975, to National Metal & Steel Corp.
General characteristics [1]
Class and type:
Displacement:
  • 4,512 metric tons (4,441 long tons) (standard)
  • 15,589 metric tons (15,343 long tons) (full load)
Length: 455 ft (139 m)
Beam: 62 ft (19 m)
Draft: 29 ft 2 in (8.89 m)
Installed power: 8,500 shp (6,300 kW)
Propulsion:
  • 1 × cross compound steam turbine
  • 1 × shaft
Speed: 15.5 knots (28.7 km/h; 17.8 mph)
Complement: 99
Armament:
Aviation facilities:

SS Dalton Victory was built as Victory ship used as a cargo ship for World War II under the Emergency Shipbuilding program. She was launched by the California Shipbuilding Company on June 6, 1944 and completed on July 19, 1944 as a Greenville Victory-class cargo ship. The ship’s United States Maritime Commission designation was VC2- S- AP3, hull number 21. She was acquired by the U.S. Navy in 1950 and renamed the USNS Dalton Victory (T-AK-256).

In 1960 she was renamed USNS Sunnyvale (T-AGM-5) and rebuilt and placed in service as a missile range instrumentation ship, and assigned to the Pacific Missile Range, where she performed missile tracking duties.

Constructed in Los Angeles, California[edit]

Dalton Victory (T-AK-256) was built by California Shipbuilding Corporation, Los Angeles, California, and was completed in 1944.

World War II[edit]

The SS Dalton Victory served in the Pacific War in World War II, she was a United States Merchant Marine ship. She was operated by Sudden & Christenson inc. from 19 July 1944 to 27 May 1946. On 27 May 1946 her operations was transferred to the Moore McCormack Lines, Inc till 3 October 1947, as a Merchant Marine ship she had a Merchant Marine crew and a United States Navy Armed Guard to man the deck guns. Dalton Victory had enemy attacks from the air, subs and ships. She was placed in the National Defense Reserve Fleet in the James River on 3 October 1947. One 2 April 1948 she was removed from the Reserve Fleet and put under the US Army Transportation Service, during the War the SS Dalton Victory too supplies to Pacific War. She was at the Battle of Leyte, Battle of Okinawa and Battle of Iwo Jima, during and after the war she had the difficult task of returning the bodies of fallen troops back to the USA.[2][3][4][5][6][7][8]

Acquired by MSTS as a cargo ship[edit]

Dalton Victory was acquired by the Navy and assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) in a noncommissioned status on 9 August 1950. SS Dalton Victory served as cargo ship supplying goods for the Korean War. SS Dalton Victory transported goods, mail, food and other supplies. SS Dalton Victory made trips between the US and Korea helping American forces engaged against Communist aggression in South Korea.[9][10]

Assigned as a missile tracking ship[edit]

On 27 October 1960 Dalton Victory was reconfigured as a missile range instrumentation ship and renamed USNS Sunnyvale (T-AGM-5).

USNS Sunnyvale carried out a multitude of duties in the Pacific Ocean through 1962, including operations in support of the Pacific Missile Range, Point Mugu, California.

Two other ships were reconfigured in to this new class, Longview-class missile range instrumentation ship, the USNS Private Joe E. Mann (T-AK-253) and the USNS Longview (T-AGM-3).

Inactivation[edit]

Sunnyvale was placed out of service at an unknown date, and was struck from the Navy List on 15 December 1974. She was disposed of by the U.S. Maritime Administration on 17 July 1975.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "USNS Sunnyvale (T-AGM-5)". Navsource.org. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  2. ^ genealogy.com, KIA Iwo Jima - PFC Blach USC - Michigan
  3. ^ The Morning News from Wilmington, Delaware · Page 20, August 29, 1945
  4. ^ vetaffairs.sd.gov, In Memory of U.S. Army Private, William Hamilton Wilcox, Jr.
  5. ^ newbuffalogenes.com, World War II 1943 Memorial Page
  6. ^ PFC Erwin G. Hudson
  7. ^ Root.com, The Western Star, December 17, 1948, Body of Sailor Home for Burial
  8. ^ The Post-Register from Idaho Falls, Idaho, Page 8<, December 1, 1948
  9. ^ Korean War Educator, Merchant Marine, Accounts of the Korean War
  10. ^ Small United States and United Nations Warships in the Korean War, By Paul M. Edwards