Page semi-protected

Wikipedia:Today's featured article

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Today's featured article

This star symbolizes the featured content on Wikipedia.

At the top of the Main Page, a summarized lead section from one of Wikipedia's featured articles is displayed as "Today's featured article" (TFA). The current month's queue can be found here. TFAs are scheduled by the TFA coordinators, Crisco 1492 (Chris), Dank (Dan), Jimfbleak, and Mike Christie. Community discussion of suggestions takes place at the TFA requests page.

If you notice an error in a future TFA summary, you're welcome to fix it yourself, but if the mistake is in today's or tomorrow's summary, you can leave a message at WP:ERRORS to ask an administrator to fix it. The summaries are formatted as a single paragraph of around 1,150 characters (including spaces), with no reference tags or alternative names. Only the link to the specified featured article is bolded, and this must be the first link. The summary should be preceded by an appropriate image when available; fair use images are not allowed.

The editnotice template for Today's Featured Article is {{TFA-editnotice}}. It is automatically applied by {{Editnotices/Namespace/Main}} when the article's title matches the contents of {{TFA title}}. To contact the TFA coordinators, please leave a message on the TFA talk page, or type "{{@TFA}}" in a signed comment on any talk page.

Featured content:

Today's featured article (TFA):

Featured article tools:


Today's featured article

Fortepiano by J. A. Stein, Augsburg

The Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor, K. 491, is a concerto by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart for keyboard (period fortepiano pictured) and orchestra. He composed it in the winter of 1785–86 and completed it on 24 March 1786. He played the solo part in the premiere in early April that year at the Burgtheater in Vienna. The work is one of only two minor-key piano concertos by Mozart, the other being No. 20 in D Minor. It features the largest array of instruments of any Mozart concerto: strings, woodwinds including oboes and clarinets, horns, trumpets and timpani. The concerto consists of three movements. The first, Allegro, is in sonata form and is longer than any opening movement of Mozart's earlier concertos. The second movement, Larghetto, features a strikingly simple principal theme, and the final Allegretto presents a theme followed by eight variations. The work is one of Mozart's most advanced compositions in the concerto genre. Early admirers included Ludwig van Beethoven and Johannes Brahms. The musicologist Arthur Hutchings considered it to be Mozart's greatest piano concerto. (Full article...)

Tomorrow's featured article

Jean Bellette (25 March 1908 – 16 March 1991) was an Australian artist. Born in Tasmania, she was educated in Hobart and at Julian Ashton's art school in Sydney, where her teachers included Thea Proctor. In London she studied under painters Bernard Meninsky and Mark Gertler. A modernist painter, Bellette was influential in mid-twentieth-century Sydney art circles. She frequently painted scenes influenced by the Greek tragedies of Euripedes, Sophocles and Homer. The only woman to win the Sulman Prize more than once, Bellette claimed the accolade in 1942 with For Whom the Bell Tolls, and in 1944 with Iphigenia in Tauris. She helped found the Blake Prize for religious art, and was its inaugural judge. Bellette and her husband, the artist and critic Paul Haefliger, owned a cottage in Hill End, an old gold mining village in central New South Wales. Bellette bequeathed the cottage to the National Parks and Wildlife Service (which manages the Hill End historic site) for use as an artists' retreat. It continues to operate for that purpose. (Full article...)