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Wikipedia:Today's featured article

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Today's featured article

This star symbolizes the featured content on Wikipedia.

At the top of the Main Page, a summarized lead section from one of Wikipedia's featured articles is displayed as "Today's featured article" (TFA). The current month's queue can be found here. TFAs are scheduled by the TFA coordinators, Dank (Dan), Jimfbleak, and Mike Christie. Community discussion of suggestions takes place at the TFA requests page.

If you notice an error in a future TFA summary, you're welcome to fix it yourself, but if the mistake is in today's or tomorrow's summary, you can leave a message at WP:ERRORS to ask an administrator to fix it. The summaries are formatted as a single paragraph of around 1,150 characters (including spaces), with no reference tags or alternative names. Only the link to the specified featured article is bolded, and this must be the first link. The summary should be preceded by an appropriate image when available; fair use images are not allowed.

The editnotice template for Today's Featured Article is {{TFA-editnotice}}. It is automatically applied by {{Editnotices/Namespace/Main}} when the article's title matches the contents of {{TFA title}}. To contact the TFA coordinators, please leave a message on the TFA talk page, or type "{{@TFA}}" in a signed comment on any talk page.

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Today's featured article

Justice Stephen Breyer, who delivered the opinion
Stephen Breyer

Heffernan v. City of Paterson was a U.S. Supreme Court case concerning the First Amendment rights of public employees, decided on April 26, 2016. Jeffrey Heffernan, a detective with the Paterson, New Jersey, police force, was seen with a lawn sign for the candidate challenging the city's incumbent mayor. Heffernan's supervisors mistakenly thought that he was actively supporting the challenger and demoted him. He brought suit alleging that his demotion violated his right to free speech. Writing for a majority of the Supreme Court, Justice Stephen Breyer (pictured) cited the Court's precedents, which had held that it is unconstitutional for a government agency to discipline an employee for engaging in partisan political activity, as long as that activity is not disruptive to the agency's operations. Even if Heffernan was not actually engaging in protected speech, he wrote, the discipline against him sent a message to others to avoid exercising their rights. Justice Clarence Thomas wrote a dissenting opinion, joined by Justice Samuel Alito, in which he agreed that Heffernan had been harmed but not that his constitutional rights had been violated. (Full article...)

Tomorrow's featured article

The Greencards in 2010

The Greencards are a progressive bluegrass band founded in 2003 in Austin, Texas, by Englishman Eamon McLoughlin and Australians Kym Warner and Carol Young. They relocated in 2005 to Nashville, Tennessee. Their albums include Movin' On (2003), Weather and Water, Viridian (2007), and Fascination (2009). Their sound has been compared to progressive American folk rock. Country Music Television named Weather and Water one of the ten best bluegrass albums of 2005, and The Greencards were invited to tour with Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson the same year. Viridian, a critically praised album, was number one on Billboard magazine's Bluegrass Music Chart, and was nominated for Best Country Album by the Australian Recording Industry Association. The "Mucky the Duck" track was nominated for Best Country Instrumental Performance at the 50th Grammy Awards. McLoughlin left the band in December 2009, and Carl Miner joined in May 2010. Credited with helping to expand the range of bluegrass music, they draw from Irish folk music, Romani music, rock 'n' roll, folk balladry, and Latin American musical sources. (Full article...)