'Ajam of Kuwait

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Ayam
العيم
Regions with significant populations
Kuwait
Religion
Predominantly Shi'a Islam
Minority Sunni Islam
Related ethnic groups
Ajam of Bahrain

Ayam[1][2] are Kuwaiti citizens of Iranian origin, who migrated to Kuwait over the last couple of hundred years.[3][4] Historically, Persian ports provided most of Kuwait's economic needs.[5] Marafi Behbahani was one of the first merchants to settle in Kuwait in the 18th century.[6]

The majority of Shia Kuwaitis are of Iranian descent.[7][8][9] However, some Kuwaitis of Iranian origin are Sunni, the Kuwaitis of Iranian Balochi origin are predominantly Sunni Muslim.[10] Balochi families first immigrated to Kuwait in the 19th century.[11]

The Persian sub-dialects of Larestani, Khonji, Bastaki and Gerashi have influenced the vocabulary of Kuwaiti Arabic.[12] There are also Ayam of Sayyid origin.[13]

Notable people[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Article in AL-AAN online newspaper Archived 15 April 2015 at the Wayback Machine. (in Arabic) November 2010
  2. ^ Article by Waleed aj-Jasim in Al-Watan daily newspaper Archived 15 April 2015 at the Wayback Machine. (in Arabic). 25 May 2013
  3. ^ "Policing Iranian Sanctions: Trade, Identity, and Smuggling Networks in the Arabian Gulf" (PDF). pp. 25–27. Archived (PDF) from the original on 20 December 2016. 
  4. ^ Taqi, Hanan (2010). Two ethnicities, three generations: Phonological variation and change in Kuwait (PDF) (PhD). Newcastle University. Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 October 2013. 
  5. ^ "The Emergence of the Gulf States: Studies in Modern History". J. E. Peterson. 2016. p. 107. Archived from the original on 5 January 2014. 
  6. ^ "The Shia Migration from Southwestern Iran to Kuwait: Push-Pull Factors during the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries". Georgia State University. 2014. Archived from the original on 27 December 2016. 
  7. ^ Binder, Leonard (1999). Ethnic Conflict and International Politics in the Middle East. p. 164. ISBN 9780813016870. Archived from the original on 8 December 2013. Unlike the Shi'a of Saudi Arabia or Bahrain, the Kuwaiti Shi'a mostly are of Persian descent. 
  8. ^ "Business Politics in the Middle East". Rivka Azoulay. 2013. p. 71. Archived from the original on 20 August 2017. 
  9. ^ "Islam in the World Today: A Handbook of Politics, Religion, Culture, and Society". Werner Ende, Udo Steinbach. 2002. p. 533. Archived from the original on 31 December 2013. 
  10. ^ "The Baluch Presence in the Persian Gulf" (PDF). 2013. pp. 742–743. Archived (PDF) from the original on 24 April 2014. 
  11. ^ "The Shia Migration from Southwestern Iran to Kuwait: Push-Pull Factors during the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries". Georgia State University. 2012. pp. 71–72. Archived from the original on 5 January 2014. 
  12. ^ "Lang & Linguistic in Bahrain Mon". Al-Tajir. 2013. p. 11. Archived from the original on 5 January 2014. 
  13. ^ Murtadha Mutahhari, Majmu'at al-Athaar, Part 18. Qum, Tehran. p. 124