131 Vala

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from (131) Vala)
Jump to: navigation, search
131 Vala
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Christian Heinrich Friedrich Peters
Discovery date 24 May 1873
Designations
MPC designation (131) Vala
Main belt[1]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 142.88 yr (52187 d)
Aphelion 2.5979 AU (388.64 Gm)
Perihelion 2.26604 AU (338.995 Gm)
2.43198 AU (363.819 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.068233
3.79 yr (1385.3 d)
19.08 km/s
289.275°
0° 15m 35.532s / day
Inclination 4.9602°
65.682°
160.641°
Earth MOID 1.25637 AU (187.950 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.37651 AU (355.521 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.499
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 40.44±1.8 km[1]
Mass 6.9×1016 kg
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0113 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0214 km/s
5.1812 h (0.21588 d)[1]
0.1051±0.010
Temperature ~178 K
K[2] (Bus)
10.03[1]

131 Vala is an inner main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by C. H. F. Peters on May 24, 1873, and named after Völva, a prophetess in Norse mythology.[3] One observation of an occultation of a star by Vala is from Italy (May 26, 2002). 10-µm radiometric data collected from Kitt Peak in 1975 gave a diameter estimate of 34 km.[4]

In the Tholen classification system, it is categorized as an SU-type asteroid, while the Bus asteroid taxonomy system lists it as an K-type asteroid.[2] Photometric observations of this asteroid during 2007 at the Organ Mesa Observatory in Las Cruces, New Mexico were used to create a "nearly symmetric bimodal" light curve plot. This showed a rotation period of 10.359 ± 0.001 hours and a brightness variation of 0.09 ± 0.02 magnitude during each cycle.[5] The result is double the 5.18 hour period reported in the JPL Small-Body Database.[1]

On 2028-Apr-05, Vala will pass 0.0276 AU (4,130,000 km; 2,570,000 mi) from asteroid 2 Pallas.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 131 Vala" (2011-10-20 last obs (arc=138 years)). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b DeMeo, Francesca E.; et al. (July 2009), "An extension of the Bus asteroid taxonomy into the near-infrared" (PDF), Icarus, 202 (1), pp. 160–180, Bibcode:2009Icar..202..160D, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.02.005, archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-03-17, retrieved 2013-04-08.  See appendix A.
  3. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D.; International Astronomical Union (2003). Dictionary of minor planet names. Berlin; New York: Springer-Verlag. p. 27. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  4. ^ Morrison, D.; Chapman, C. R. (March 1976), "Radiometric diameters for an additional 22 asteroids", Astrophysical Journal, 204, pp. 934–939, Bibcode:2008mgm..conf.2594S, doi:10.1142/9789812834300_0469. 
  5. ^ Pilcher, Frederick (June 2008), "Period Determination for 84 Klio, 98 Ianthe, 102 Miriam 112 Iphigenia, 131 Vala, and 650 Amalasuntha", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 35 (2), pp. 71–72, Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...71P, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009. 
  6. ^ "JPL Close-Approach Data: 131 Vala" (2011-10-20 last obs (arc=138 years)). Retrieved 2011-12-07. 

External links[edit]