(15807) 1994 GV9

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(15807) 1994 GV9
Discovery
Discovered by David C. Jewitt and Jun Chen
Discovery date 15 April 1994
Designations
none
TNO (cubewano)[1]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc 7627 days (20.88 yr)
Aphelion 46.82930 AU (7.005564 Tm)
Perihelion 41.21220 AU (6.165257 Tm)
44.02075 AU (6.585410 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.063801
292.07 yr (106680 d)
4.49 km/s
68.3713°
0° 0m 12.148s / day
Inclination 0.562933°
176.746°
309.924°
Earth MOID 40.2276 AU (6.01796 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 35.9084 AU (5.37182 Tm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 5.923
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 146 km[3]
Mass ?×10? kg
Mean density
? g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
? m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
? km/s
? d
0.09 (assumed)
Temperature ~42 K
?
7.4[2]

(15807) 1994 GV9, also written (15807) 1994 GV9, is a trans-Neptunian object of the cubewano class. It was discovered on April 15, 1994, by David C. Jewitt and Jun Chen at the Observatories at Mauna Kea, near Hilo. Very little is known about the object.

(15807) 1994 GV9 is the second cubewano to be given an official Minor Planet Center catalog number.[4] The first cubewano is (15760) 1992 QB1.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marc W. Buie (22 March 2002). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 15807". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2008-09-29. 
  2. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 15807 (1994 GV9)". 22 March 2002. Retrieved 8 April 2016. 
  3. ^ Wm. Robert Johnston (22 August 2008). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Archived from the original on 28 September 2008. Retrieved 2008-09-29. 
  4. ^ "MPEC 2008-O05 : Distant Minor Planets (2008 AUG. 2.0 TT)". Minor Planet Center. 17 July 2008. Retrieved 2011-01-08. 

External links[edit]