(181902) 1999 RD215

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(181902) 1999 RD215
Discovery [1][2]
Discovered by C. Trujillo
J. X. Luu
D. C. Jewitt
Discovery site Mauna Kea Obs.
Discovery date 6 September 1999
Designations
MPC designation (181902) 1999 RD215
1999 RD215
TNO[1] · SDO[3][4] · distant[2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3 [1] · 1 [2]
Observation arc 8.03 yr (2,933 days)
Aphelion 204.40 AU
Perihelion 37.541 AU
120.97 AU
Eccentricity 0.6897
1330.58 yr (485,993 d)
7.8003°
0° 0m 2.52s / day
Inclination 25.990°
210.32°
137.86°
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
147 km[4]
148 km[5]
0.08 (estimate)[5]
0.09 (estimate)[4]
7.4[1] · 7.6[5]

(181902) 1999 RD215 is a trans-Neptunian object of the scattered disc, approximately 148 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 6 September 1999, by American astronomers Chad Trujillo, Jane Luu, and David Jewitt at the Mauna Kea Observatories, Hawaii.[2][3]

Orbit and classification[edit]

1999 RD215 orbits from the center of the Kuiper belt to well beyond into the scattered disc. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 37.5–204.4 AU once every 1330 years and 7 months (485,993 days; semi-major axis of 121 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.69 and an inclination of 26° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The body's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation.[2]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the Johnston's Archive and Michael Brown, 1999 RD215 measures 147 and 148 kilometers in diameter, and its surface has an estimated albedo of 0.09 and 0.08, respectively.[4][5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 181902 (1999 RD215)" (2007-09-17 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 16 January 2018. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "181902 (1999 RD215)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 16 January 2018. 
  3. ^ a b "List Of Centaurs and Scattered-Disk Objects". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 16 January 2018. 
  4. ^ a b c d Johnston, Wm. Robert (15 October 2017). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 16 January 2018. 
  5. ^ a b c d Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system?". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 16 January 2018. 

External links[edit]