(182294) 2001 KU76

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(182294) 2001 KU76
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Buie, M. W.
Discovery date 24 May 2001
Designations
MPC designation (182294) 2001 KU76
Trans-Neptunian object
6:11 resonance[2][3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 4
Observation arc 2536 days (6.94 yr)
Aphelion 52.656 AU (7.8772 Tm) (Q)
Perihelion 37.693 AU (5.6388 Tm) (q)
45.175 AU (6.7581 Tm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.16561 (e)
303.63 yr (110903 d)
354.46° (M)
0° 0m 11.686s / day (n)
Inclination 10.637° (i)
44.987° (Ω)
204.39° (ω)
Earth MOID 36.6816 AU (5.48749 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 32.3615 AU (4.84121 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 211 km (assumed)[4]
0.09 (assumed)
6.6[1]

(182294) 2001 KU76, provisionally known as 2001 KU76, is a trans-Neptunian object (TNO) that has a 6:11 resonance with Neptune.[2] This is the same resonance that dwarf planet Makemake is either near or in.[5]

It will come to perihelion in 2021.[1]

Assuming a generic TNO albedo of 0.09, it is about 211 km in diameter.[4] The assumed diameter of this object makes it a possible dwarf planet.[6]

Resonance[edit]

Simulations by Lykawka in 2007 show that (182294) 2001 KU76 is librating in the 11:6 resonance with Neptune.[2][3] This is the same resonance that dwarf planet Makemake is either near or in.[5] Both objects have a semi-major axis of 45 AU and an orbital period of about 302 years.

It has been observed 29 times over 6 years and has an orbit quality code of 4.[1]

The libration of 2001 KU76. Neptune is the white (stationary) dot at 5 o'clock. Uranus is blue, Saturn yellow, and Jupiter red.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 182294 (2001 KU76)" (2008-05-03 last obs). Retrieved 7 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Mukai, Tadashi (July 2007). "Dynamical classification of trans-neptunian objects: Probing their origin, evolution, and interrelation". Icarus. 189 (1): 213–232. Bibcode:2007Icar..189..213L. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2007.01.001. 
  3. ^ a b Buie, Marc W. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 182294" (2008-05-03 using 29 observations). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-02-06. 
  4. ^ a b Johnston, Wm. Robert (22 August 2008). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 2009-02-06. 
  5. ^ a b Tony Dunn (Author of Gravity Simulator). "Possible resonances of Eris (2003 UB313) and Makemake (2005 FY9)". Gravity Simulator. Retrieved 2009-02-06. 
  6. ^ Brown, Michael E. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Archived from the original on 2011-10-18. Retrieved 2012-09-04. 

External links[edit]