189 Phthia

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189 Phthia
Discovery[1]
Discovered by C. H. F. Peters
Discovery site Clinton, New York
Discovery date 9 September 1878
Designations
MPC designation (189) Phthia
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[2][3]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 136.18 yr (49739 d)
Aphelion 2.5415 AU (380.20 Gm)
Perihelion 2.3597 AU (353.01 Gm)
2.4506 AU (366.60 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.037105
3.84 yr (1401.2 d)
336.98°
0° 15m 24.912s / day
Inclination 5.1774°
203.42°
168.03°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 37.66±2.0 km[2]
40.91 ± 1.36 km[4]
Mass (3.84 ± 0.81) × 1016 kg[4]
Mean density
1.07 ± 0.25 g/cm3[4]
22.346 h (0.9311 d)[2][5]
0.2310±0.027[2]
0.1566 ± 0.0349[6]
S[6] (Tholen)
9.33,[2] 9.60[6]

189 Phthia is a bright-coloured, rocky main belt asteroid that was discovered by German-American astronomer Christian Heinrich Friedrich Peters on September 9, 1878[1] in Clinton, New York and named after Phthia, a region of Ancient Greece.

Photometric observations of this asteroid at the Organ Mesa Observatory in Las Cruces, New Mexico during 2008 gave a light curve with a period of 22.346 ± 0.001 hours and a brightness variation of 0.26 ± 0.02 in magnitude.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Numbered Minor Planets 1–5000", Discovery Circumstances, IAU Minor Planet center, retrieved 2013-04-07. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Yeomans, Donald K., "189 Phthia", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  3. ^ "The Asteroid Orbital Elements Database". astorb. Lowell Observatory. 
  4. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336Freely accessible, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  5. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick (January 2009), "Period Determinations for 33 Polyhymnia, 38 Leda, 50 Virginia, 189 Phthia, and 290 Bruna", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 36 (1), pp. 25–27, Bibcode:2009MPBu...36...25P. 
  6. ^ a b c Pravec, P.; et al. (May 2012), "Absolute Magnitudes of Asteroids and a Revision of Asteroid Albedo Estimates from WISE Thermal Observations", Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2012, Proceedings of the conference held May 16–20, 2012 in Niigata, Japan (1667), Bibcode:2012LPICo1667.6089P.  See Table 4.

External links[edit]