(275809) 2001 QY297

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(275809) 2001 QY297
Discovery[1][2]
Discovered by Marc William Buie
Discovery date 21 August 2001
Designations
MPC designation (275809) 2001 QY297
2001 QY297
TNO (cubewano)[3]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2013 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 47.380 AU
Perihelion 40.013 AU
43.697 AU
Eccentricity 0.084
288.86 a
84.415°
Inclination 1.548°
108.776°
123.591°
Known satellites 1
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 229+22
−108
 km
(combined)
169+16
−80
 km
(primary)
154+15
−73
 km
(satellite)[4]
Mass (4.105±0.038)×1018 kg[4]
Mean density
0.92+1.30
−0.27
 g/cm3
[4][a]
11.68 [5]
Albedo 0.152+0.439
−0.035
[4]
Spectral type
V−R=0.43 ± 0.09
B−V=0.7[1]
5.86 ± 0.31[6]

(275809) 2001 QY297 is a binary classical Kuiper belt object belonging to the cold population.[4]

Discovery and orbit[edit]

2001 QY297 was discovered on 21 August 2001 by Marc William Buie from Cerro Tololo Observatory, La Serena, Chile.[1][3] 2001 QY297 belongs to the dynamically cold population of the classical Kuiper belt objects, which have small orbital eccentricities and inclinations. Their semi-major axes reside mainly in the interval 40–45 AU.[4]

Satellite[edit]

2001 QY297 is a binary system consisting of two components of approximately equal size.[4] The satellite was discovered on 18 April 2006.[1] Assuming that both components have the same albedo, the primary is estimated to be about 169 km in diameter. The size of the secondary (satellite) in this case is estimated at around 154 km. The total mass of the system is approximately 4×1018 kg. The average density of both components is about 1 g/cm3.[4]

Orbital parameters of the (275809) 2001 QY297 system[7]
Semi-major axis (km) Eccentricity Period (d) Inclination (°)
9960 ± 31 0.4175 ± 0.0023 138.110 ± 0.023 172.86 ± 0.20

Physical properties[edit]

The surfaces of both components of 2001 QY297 appear to have a red color.[6] The object shows significant photometric variability with lightcurve amplitude of 0.49±0.03. The rotational period is either 5.84 or 11.68 hours.[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Assuming that both components have equal albedos and equal densities

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Wm. Robert Johnston (23 June 2015). "(275809) 2001 QY297". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 2016-03-09. 
  2. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 275809 (2001 QY297)" (2013-10-13 last obs). Retrieved 2016-03-09. 
  3. ^ a b "MPEC G54: DISTANT MINOR PLANETS (2006 Apr. 25.0 TT) [27421-2007/05-R1]". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2006-04-14. Retrieved 2016-02-24. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Vilenius, E.; Kiss, C.; Mommert, M.; et al. (2014). ""TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region X. Analysis of classical Kuiper belt objects from Herschel and Spitzer observations". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 564: A35. arXiv:1403.6309Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012A&A...541A..94V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201322416. 
  5. ^ a b A. Thirouin; K.S. Noll; J.L. Ortiz; N. Morales (2014). "Rotational properties of the binary and non-binary populations in the trans-Neptunian belt". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 569: A3. Bibcode:2014DPS....4642109T. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201423567. 
  6. ^ a b Vilenius, E.; Kiss, C.; Mommert, M.; et al. (2014). ""TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region VI. Herschel>/PACS observations and thermal modeling of 19 classical Kuiper belt objects". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 541: A94. arXiv:1204.0697Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012A&A...541A..94V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201118743. 
  7. ^ Grundy, W. M.; Noll, K. S.; Nimmo, F.; Roe, H. G.; Buie, M. W.; Porter, S. B.; Benecchi, S. D.; Stephens, D. C.; Levison, H. F.; Stansberry, J. A. (2011). "Five new and three improved mutual orbits of transneptunian binaries" (pdf). Icarus. 213 (2): 678. arXiv:1103.2751Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011Icar..213..678G. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.03.012. 

External links[edit]