(276033) 2002 AJ129

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276033 2002 AJ129
Discovery[1][2]
Discovered by NEAT at Haleakalā
Discovery date 15 January 2002
Designations
MPC designation 2002 AJ129
Apollo,[1]
Mercury crosser,
Venus crosser,
Earth crosser,
Mars crosser
Orbital characteristics[1][3]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 5194 days (14.22 yr)
Aphelion 2.62550212 AU (392.769527 Gm) (Q)
Perihelion 0.11639739 AU (17.412802 Gm) (q)
1.370949753 AU (205.0911639 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.91509726 (e)
1.61 yr (586.31 d)
279.86639° (M)
0° 36m 50.417s / day (n)
Inclination 15.479462° (i)
138.12977° (Ω)
210.92925° (ω)
Earth MOID 0.00601105 AU (899,240 km)
Jupiter MOID 2.83418 AU (423.987 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 4.194
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 0.5–1.2 km[2]
18.7[1] or 18.7[2]

(276033) 2002 AJ129, also written as 2002 AJ129, is a Mercury-crossing asteroid. It has the fourth-smallest perihelion of all numbered asteroids, after (137924) 2000 BD19, (374158) 2004 UL, and (386454) 2008 XM.[4]

It is classified as an Apollo asteroid[1] because it is a near-Earth asteroid with a semi-major axis larger than Earth's.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 276033 (2002 AJ129)". March 13, 2010. Retrieved 7 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c NeoDys-2 Retrieved 2011 September 13
  3. ^ AstDys-2 Retrieved 2011 September 13
  4. ^ List of asteroids with q<0.3075 AU generated by the JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine Retrieved 2011 September 10

External links[edit]