28 Bellona

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28 Bellona 28 Bellona symbol.svg
28Bell-LB1-mag12.jpg
Bellona (apmag 11.8) near a magnitude 12 star, next to Abell 2670[1]
Discovery
Discovered by R. Luther
Discovery date 1 March 1854
Designations
MPC designation (28) Bellona
Pronunciation /bɛˈlnə/ be-LOH-nə
Named after
Bellona
1951 CC2
Main belt
Orbital characteristics
Epoch Sept 30, 2012 (JD 2456200.5)
Aphelion 477.240 Gm (3.196 AU)
Perihelion 353.977 Gm (2.358 AU)
415.608 Gm (2.777 AU)
Eccentricity 0.151
1690.19 d (4.63 a)
121.574°
Inclination 9.430°
144.330°
344.461°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 97 ± 11 km[2]
120.9 ± 3.4 km (IRAS)[3]
108.10 ± 11.49 km[4]
Mass (2.62±0.15)×1018 kg[4]
Mean density
3.95 ± 1.28 g/cm3[4]
15.706 h[3][5]
0.1763[3][6]
S[3]
7.09[3]

28 Bellona is a large main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by R. Luther on March 1, 1854, and named after Bellōna, the Roman goddess of war; the name was chosen to mark the beginning of the Crimean War.

Bellona has been studied by radar.[7] Photometric observations of this asteroid at the Palmer Divide Observatory in Colorado Springs, Colorado in 2007 gave a light curve with a period of 15.707 ± 0.002 hours and a brightness variation of 0.27 ± 0.03 in magnitude. This report is in close agreement with a period estimate of 15.695 hours reported in 1983, and rejects a longer period of 16.523 hours reported in 1979.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Astrometry.net job 1005148". Astrometry.net. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 
  2. ^ Ďurech, Josef; Kaasalainen, Mikko; Herald, David; Dunham, David; Timerson, Brad; Hanuš, Josef; et al. (2011). "Combining asteroid models derived by lightcurve inversion with asteroidal occultation silhouettes" (PDF). Icarus. 214 (2): 652–670. arXiv:1104.4227Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011Icar..214..652D. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.03.016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 28 Bellona". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2012-01-28. 2012-01-02 last obs 
  4. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336Freely accessible, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  5. ^ http://www.psi.edu/pds/asteroid/EAR_A_5_DDR_DERIVED_LIGHTCURVE_V8_0/data/lc.tab
  6. ^ http://www.psi.edu/pds/asteroid/EAR_A_5_DDR_ALBEDOS_V1_1/data/albedos.tab
  7. ^ "Radar-Detected Asteroids and Comets". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 2011-10-30. 
  8. ^ Warner, Brian D. (December 2007), "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory - March-May 2007", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 34 (4), pp. 104–107, Bibcode:2007MPBu...34..104W. 

External links[edit]