(308193) 2005 CB79

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(308193) 2005 CB79
Haumea family orbits.png
(308193) 2005 CB79 among other Haumea family objects
Discovery[1]
Discovered by M. E. Brown,
C. A. Trujillo,
D. L. Rabinowitz
Discovery date 6 February 2005
Designations
MPC designation 2005 CB79
Cubewano (MPC)[2]
Extended (DES)[3]
Orbital characteristics[4]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 4
Observation arc 5083 days (13.92 yr)
Aphelion 50.062 AU (7.4892 Tm) (Q)
Perihelion 37.231 AU (5.5697 Tm) (q)
43.647 AU (6.5295 Tm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.14698 (e)
288.36 yr (105324 d)
319.66° (M)
0° 0m 12.305s / day (n)
Inclination 28.606° (i)
112.79° (Ω)
90.154° (ω)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 158 km[5][6]
6.76 h (0.282 d)
13.52 h[7]
0.7 (assumed)
(Neutral)
B-V=0.73, V-R=0.37[8]
21.1[9]
4.6[4]

(308193) 2005 CB79 is a trans-Neptunian object that is a member of the Haumea family.[8]

Haumea family[edit]

As a member of the Haumea family, (308193) 2005 CB79 is suspected of being an icy mantle collisional fragment from dwarf planet Haumea. With an absolute magnitude (H) of 4.7,[4] and a Haumea-family albedo of 0.7, this object would have a diameter of 158 km.[6]

Observations by Mike Brown in 2012 using the W. M. Keck Observatory suggest that (308193) 2005 CB79 does not have a companion.[10]

The + marks 2005 RR43 (B-V=0.77, V-R=0.41) on this color plot of TNOs. All the other Haumea-family members (2005 CB79: 0.73, 0.37) are located to the lower left of this point.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marsden, Brian G. (September 1, 2007). "MPEC 2007-R02 : 2003 UY413, 2003 UZ413, 2004 NT33, 2005 CA79, 2005 CB79, 2005 UQ513". IAU Minor Planet Center. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Retrieved January 10, 2010. 
  2. ^ "MPEC 2010-A05 :Distant Minor Planets (14 January 2010.0 TT)". IAU Minor Planet Center. January 2, 2010. Archived from the original on 14 January 2010. Retrieved January 10, 2010. 
  3. ^ Marc W. Buie (December 20, 2008). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 308193". SwRI (Space Science Department). Archived from the original on August 18, 2010. Retrieved January 10, 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2005 CB79)". December 20, 2008. Retrieved 7 April 2016. 
  5. ^ Assuming a Haumea-like albedo of 0.7
  6. ^ a b Dan Bruton. "Conversion of Absolute Magnitude to Diameter for Minor Planets". Department of Physics & Astronomy (Stephen F. Austin State University). Archived from the original on March 23, 2010. Retrieved December 27, 2009. 
  7. ^ Carry, Benoit; Snodgrass, Colin; Lacerda, Pedro; Hainaut, Olivier; Dumas, Christophe (16 July 2012). "Characterisation of candidate members of (136108) Haumea's family: II. Follow-up observations" (PDF). Astronomy & Astrophysics. EDP Sciences. 544. arXiv:1207.6491Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012A&A...544A.137C. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219044. Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 November 2014. Retrieved 8 June 2014. 
  8. ^ a b Snodgrass, Carry; Dumas, Hainaut (16 December 2009). "Characterisation of candidate members of (136108) Haumea's family". Astronomy and Astrophysics. arXiv:0912.3171Freely accessible. Bibcode:2010A&A...511A..72S. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/200913031. 
  9. ^ "AstDys 2005CB79 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved January 10, 2010. 
  10. ^ Plutokiller (February 3, 2012). "2005 CB79 looks solitary". Twitter. Retrieved February 3, 2012. 

External links[edit]