(33001) 1997 CU29

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(33001) 1997 CU29
Discovery
Discovered by David C. Jewitt
Jane X. Luu
Chadwick A. Trujillo
Jun Chen[1]
Discovery date 6 February 1997
Designations
MPC designation (33001) 1997 CU29
none
TNO (cubewano)[2][3]
Orbital characteristics[4]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc 5880 days (16.10 yr)
Aphelion 45.29450 AU (6.775961 Tm)
Perihelion 42.07164 AU (6.293828 Tm)
43.68307 AU (6.534894 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.036889
288.72 yr (105455 d)
4.52 km/s
248.774°
0° 0m 12.29s / day
Inclination 1.45231°
350.339°
259.868°
Earth MOID 41.0568 AU (6.14201 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 36.7177 AU (5.49289 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 211 km[5]
Mass 1.3×1019? kg
Mean density
2.0? g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0641? m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.1213? km/s
? d
0.10?
Temperature ~ 42 K
?
6.5

(33001) 1997 CU29, also written as (33001) 1997 CU29 is a cubewano. It has a perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) at 41.660 AU and an aphelion (farthest approach from the Sun) of 45.134 AU. 1997 CU29 is about 211 km in diameter. It was discovered on February 6, 1997, by David C. Jewitt, Jane X. Luu, Chad Trujillo, and Jun Chen at the Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List Of Transneptunian Objects". IAU–Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  2. ^ "MPEC 2009-R09 :Distant Minor Planets (2009 SEPT. 16.0 TT)". IAU Minor Planet Center. September 4, 2009. Retrieved October 4, 2009. 
  3. ^ Marc W. Buie (December 12, 2001). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 33001". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved October 4, 2009. 
  4. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 33001 (1997 CU29)". NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 5 April 2016. 
  5. ^ List of known trans-Neptunian objects

External links[edit]