(35671) 1998 SN165

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(35671) 1998 SN165
Discovery
Discovered by A. Gleason
Discovery date 23 September 1998
Designations
MPC designation (35671) 1998 SN165
none
TNO[1][2]
Cubewano[1]
Orbital characteristics[1][3]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc 5119 days (14.02 yr)
Aphelion 39.402 AU (5.8945 Tm)
Perihelion 36.139 AU (5.4063 Tm)
37.771 AU (5.6505 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.043207
232.13 yr (84786.7 d)
282.50°
0° 0m 15.285s / day
Inclination 4.6145°
192.12°
268.99°
Jupiter MOID 30.9558 AU (4.63092 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 393+39
−38
 km
[4]
460±80 km[5]
8.84 h (0.368 d)
8.84 hr[3]
0.04[5][a]
21.4
5.5[3]

(35671) 1998 SN165 is a trans-Neptunian object. It was discovered on 23 September 1998, by A. Gleason at Steward Observatory.

It was originally classified as a plutino with a 2:3 mean-motion resonance with Neptune,[6] but further observations have established that it is a cubewano—a member of the classical Kuiper belt.[1]

With an estimated size of 393+39
−38
 km
,[4] (35671) 1998 SN165 is a possible dwarf planet.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Using the older, larger, Spitzer size estimate of 460 km.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Marc W. Buie (2004-10-10). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 35671". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2015-06-25.
  2. ^ "MPEC 2006-X45 : Distant Minor Planets". Minor Planet Center & Tamkin Foundation Computer Network. 2006-12-21. Archived from the original on 28 August 2008. Retrieved 2008-07-18.
  3. ^ a b c "HORIZONS Web-Interface: 35671 (1998 SN165)". Retrieved 9 October 2018.
  4. ^ a b E. Vilenius; et al. (April 2014). ""TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region" (PDF). A&A. 564. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201322416. A35.
  5. ^ a b John Stansberry; Will Grundy; Mike Brown; Dale Cruikshank; John Spencer; David Trilling; Jean-Luc Margot (2007). "Physical Properties of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects: Constraints from Spitzer Space Telescope". arXiv:astro-ph/0702538.
  6. ^ Hutton, Gil (August 2001). "VR Photometry of Sixteen Kuiper Belt Objects". Icarus. pp. 246–250. Retrieved 2007-10-17.

External links[edit]