369 Aëria

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369 Aëria
Discovery [1]
Discovered by A. Borrelly
Discovery site Marseille Obs.
Discovery date 4 July 1893
Designations
MPC designation (369) Aëria
Named after
Air[2] (classical element)
1893 AE · 1949 MY
A894 WA
main-belt · middle
Aeria[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 123.99 yr (45,288 days)
Aphelion 2.9068 AU
Perihelion 2.3952 AU
2.6510 AU
Eccentricity 0.0965
4.32 yr (1,577 days)
205.45°
0° 13m 41.88s / day
Inclination 12.706°
94.209°
268.82°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 60.00±1.2 km[4][5]
65.39±0.72 km[6]
70.798±2.087 km[7]
73.767±1.072 km[8]
4.774±0.001 h[9]
4.7776±0.0002 h[10]
4.7780±0.0005 h[11]
4.787 h[12]
4.82 h[13]
14 h (poor)[14]
0.127±0.018[8]
0.1378±0.0234[7]
0.163±0.004[6]
0.1919±0.008[4][5]
Tholen = M [1][4] · M[12][15]
B–V = 0.711 [1]
U–B = 0.274 [1]
8.52[1][4][5][6][7][8] · 8.78±0.77[16]

369 Aëria, provisional designation 1893 AE, is a metallic asteroid and the parent body of the Aeria family. It orbits in the central region of the asteroid belt, rotates every 4.778 hours and measures approximately 65 kilometers in diameter. The asteroid was discovered on 4 July 1893, by French astronomer Alphonse Borrelly at the Marseille Observatory in southeastern France.[17] It was named for "Air", one of the four classical elements: earth, water, air and fire.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Aëria is the parent body of the Aeria family (539),[3] a small asteroid family of less than 300 known members,[18]:23 while he Lightcurve Data Base dynamically groups it to the much larger Eunomia family (502).[4] Named members of the Aeria family include 1184 Gaea, 3324 Avsyuk, 130066 Timhaltigin and 144303 Mirellabreschi.[3]

Aëria orbits the Sun in the central main-belt at a distance of 2.4–2.9 AU once every 4 years and 4 months (1,577 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.10 and an inclination of 13° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The body's observation arc begins at Marseille on 6 July 1893, two nights after its official discovery observation.[17]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In the Tholen classification, Aëria is a metallic M-type asteroid.[1][4][15][12] This agrees with the more generic X-type, assigned to members of the Aeria family.[18]:23

Rotation period[edit]

Several rotational lightcurves of Aëria have been obtained from photometric observations since 1984, when it was first observed at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. Lightcurve analysis gave a consolidated rotation period of 4.778 hours with a brightness amplitude between 0.04 and 0.13 magnitude (U=2/2/3/2/1).[9][10][11][12][13][14]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the surveys carried out by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRAS, the Japanese Akari satellite and the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Aëria measures between 60.00 and 73.77 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo between 0.127 and 0.1919.[5][6][7][8]

The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link adopts the results obtained by IRAS, that is, an albedo of 0.1919 and a diameter of 60.0 kilometers based on an absolute magnitude of 8.52.[5][4]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named after "Air", one of the four classical elements: earth, water, air and fire. It is thought that the asteroid's name may have also been inspired by the two letters of its provisional designation, 1893 AE.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 369 Aeria (1893 AE)" (2017-07-03 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (369) Aëria. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 45. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c "Small Bodies Data Ferret". Nesvorny HCM Asteroid Families V3.0. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "LCDB Data for (369) Aëria". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c d Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  8. ^ a b c d Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  9. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (369) Aëria". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  10. ^ a b Higgins, David (January 2011). "Period Determination of Asteroid Targets Observed at Hunters Hill Observatory: May 2009 - September 2010". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 38 (1): 41–46. Bibcode:2011MPBu...38...41H. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  11. ^ a b Stephens, Robert D. (July 2012). "Asteroids Observed from GMARS and Santana Observatories: 2012 January - March". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (3): 181–183. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39..181S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  12. ^ a b c d Dotto, E.; Barucci, M. A.; Fulchignoni, M.; di Martino, M.; Rotundi, A.; Burchi, R.; et al. (October 1992). "M-type asteroids - Rotational properties of 16 objects". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series: 195–211. Bibcode:1992A&AS...95..195D. ISSN 0365-0138. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  13. ^ a b Schober, H. J.; Erikson, A.; Hahn, G.; Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Albrecht, R.; Ornig, W.; et al. (June 1994). "Physical studies of asteroids. XXVIII. Lightcurves and photoelectric photometry of asteroids 2, 14, 51, 105, 181, 238, 258, 369, 377, 416, 487, 626, 679, 1048 and 2183". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series. 105. Bibcode:1994A&AS..105..281S. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  14. ^ a b Schober, H. J. (December 1985). "IS 369 Aeria a slowly rotating asteroid?". IN: Asteroids. Bibcode:1986acm..proc...73S. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  15. ^ a b Belskaya, I. N.; Fornasier, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Cellino, A.; Antonyuk, K.; et al. (March 2017). "Refining the asteroid taxonomy by polarimetric observations". Icarus. 284: 30–42. Bibcode:2017Icar..284...30B. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2016.11.003. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  16. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  17. ^ a b "369 Aeria (1893 AE)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 
  18. ^ a b Nesvorný, D.; Broz, M.; Carruba, V. (December 2014). "Identification and Dynamical Properties of Asteroid Families" (PDF). Asteroids IV: 297–321. arXiv:1502.01628Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015aste.book..297N. doi:10.2458/azu_uapress_9780816532131-ch016. Retrieved 24 October 2017. 

External links[edit]