379 Huenna

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379 Huenna
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Auguste Charlois
Discovery date 8 January 1894
Designations
MPC designation (379) Huenna
Named after
Ven
1894 AQ; A895 DB; A911 BA; 1948 XM
Main belt (Themis)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 122.26 yr (44656 d)
Aphelion 3.7186 AU (556.29 Gm)
Perihelion 2.5540 AU (382.07 Gm)
3.1363 AU (469.18 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.18567
5.55 yr (2028.7 d)
126.109°
0° 10m 38.82s / day
Inclination 1.6699°
172.036°
179.961°
Known satellites 1 (5.8±1.2 km)[2]
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 92.33±1.7 km (IRAS)[1]
98±3 km[2]
Mass 3.83±0.19×1017 kg[2][3]
Mean density
0.9±0.1 g/cm³[2][3]
1.2 g/cm³[4][5]
14.141 h (0.5892 d)[1]
0.0587±0.002[1]
C[3]
8.87[1]

379 Huenna is a large asteroid orbiting in the asteroid belt. It is part of the Themis family, and thus a C-type asteroid and consequently composed mainly of carbonaceous material.

It was discovered by Auguste Charlois on 8 January 1894 in Nice, it is named after the Swedish island of Hven, the site of two observatories.

A satellite, 7 km across and designated S/2003 (379) 1, was discovered on 14 August 2003 by Jean-Luc Margot using the Keck II adaptive optics telescope at Mauna Kea.[6] The moon orbits 3400±11 km away in 80.8±0.36 d with an eccentricity of 0.334±0.075.[5] The system is loosely bound[4] as Huenna has a Hill sphere with a radius of about 20,000 km.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 379 Huenna (1894 AQ)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 2012-01-03 last obs. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Marchis, Franck; P. Descamps; J. Berthier; D. hestroffer; F. vachier; M. Baek; et al. (2008). "Main Belt Binary Asteroidal Systems With Eccentric Mutual Orbits". Icarus. 195 (1): 295–316. arXiv:0804.1385Freely accessible. Bibcode:2008Icar..195..295M. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2007.12.010. 
  3. ^ a b c Jim Baer (12 December 2010). "Recent Asteroid Mass Determinations". Personal Website. Retrieved 2012-02-03. 
  4. ^ a b Franck Marchis (May 2005). "379 Huenna and S/2003 (379) 1". UCB. Retrieved 2012-02-03. 
  5. ^ a b Wm. Robert Johnston (25 November 2008). "(379) Huenna and S/2003 (379) 1". Johnston's Archive. Archived from the original on 11 December 2005. Retrieved 2005-11-11. 
  6. ^ "IAUC 8182: S/2003 (379) 1; 2003he, 2003hf; C/2003 H1; C/2001 Q4". IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. 2003-08-15. Retrieved 2012-02-04. 

External links[edit]