(416151) 2002 RQ25

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(416151) 2002 RQ25
Discovery [1]
Discovered by CINEOS
Discovery site Campo Imperatore Obs.
Discovery date 3 September 2002
Designations
MPC designation (416151) 2002 RQ25
2002 RQ25
Apollo · NEO[1] · PHA[2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 14.13 yr (5,160 days)
Aphelion 1.4523 AU
Perihelion 0.7711 AU
1.1117 AU
Eccentricity 0.3064
1.17 yr (428 days)
8.4222°
0° 50m 26.88s / day
Inclination 4.5766°
10.520°
225.68°
Earth MOID 0.0499 AU · 19.4 LD
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 0.225 km (calculated)[3]
12.191±0.005 h[4]
0.20 (assumed)[3]
C[3] · C/X[5]
20.6[1][3]

(416151) 2002 RQ25 is a carbonaceous asteroid of the Apollo group, classified as near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid, approximately 0.2 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 3 September 2002, by the Campo Imperatore Near-Earth Object Survey (CINEOS) at the Italian Campo Imperatore Observatory, located in the Abruzzo region, east of Rome.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

2002 RQ25 orbits the Sun at a distance of 0.8–1.5 AU once every 1 years and 2 months (428 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.31 and an inclination of 5° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

The asteroid's minimum orbit intersection distance with Earth is 0.0499 AU (7,460,000 km), which is currently exactly at the threshold limit of 0.05 AU (or about 19.5 lunar distances) to make it a potentially hazardous object.[1]

Physical characteristics[edit]

The carbonaceous C-type asteroid asteroid is also classified as a C/X-type body according to the survey carried out by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.[5]

Lightcurve[edit]

A rotational lightcurve of 2002 RQ25 was obtained from photometric observations made by American astronomer Brian Warner at his Palmer Divide Observatory, Colorado, in February 2015. The ambiguous lightcurve rendered a rotation period of 12.191±0.005 hours with a brightness variation of 0.72 magnitude (U=2+), while a second solution gave 6.096 hours (or half of the first period) with an amplitude of 0.43.[4]

The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes a standard albedo for stony asteroids of 0.20 and calculates diameter of 225 meters with an absolute magnitude of 20.6.[3]

Naming[edit]

As of 2017, this minor planet remains unnamed.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 416151 (2002 RQ25)" (2016-10-19 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c "416151 (2002 RQ25)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 11 April 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (416151)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 11 April 2016. 
  4. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (July 2015). "Near-Earth Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2015 January - March". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 42 (3): 172–183. Bibcode:2015MPBu...42..172W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 11 April 2016. 
  5. ^ a b Thomas, Cristina A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Trilling, David E.; Delbó, Marco; Hora, Joseph L.; Mueller, Michael (January 2014). "Physical characterization of Warm Spitzer-observed near-Earth objects". Icarus. 228: 217–246. arXiv:1310.2000Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014Icar..228..217T. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2013.10.004. Retrieved 11 April 2016. 

External links[edit]