(44594) 1999 OX3

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(44594) 1999 OX3
Discovery [1]
Discovered by J. J. Kavelaars
B. Gladman
M. Holman
J. Petit
Discovery site Mauna Kea Obs.
Discovery date 21 July 1999
Designations
MPC designation (44594) 1999 OX3
1999 OX3
TNO[1][2] · centaur[3][4]
distant[5]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 2
Observation arc 17.35 yr (6,338 days)
Aphelion 46.576 AU
Perihelion 17.589 AU
32.083 AU
Eccentricity 0.4518
181.72 yr (66,375 days)
347.21°
0° 0m 19.44s / day
Inclination 2.6248°
259.10°
144.53°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 151 km[3][6]
159.78 km (calculated)[2]
9.26 h[2][7]
0.10 (assumed)[2]
RR[3][8] · C[2]
6.07±0.19 (R)[9] · 6.835±0.078 (R)[10] · 7.1[1][2] · 7.4[7] · 7.718±0.092[a] · 7.85[6]

(44594) 1999 OX3 is an eccentric trans-Neptunian object with a centaur-like orbit from the outer Solar System, approximately 150 kilometers in diameter.[3] It was discovered on 21 July 1999, by astronomers John Kavelaars, Brett Gladman, Matthew Holman and Jean-Marc Petit at Mauna Kea Observatories, Hawaii, United States.[5]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Orbit diagram (top view, 1999 OX3 in blue)

1999 OX3 orbits the Sun at a distance of 17.6–46.6 AU once every 181 years and 9 months (66,375 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.45 and an inclination of 3° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The body's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation at Mauna Kea in 1999.[5]

Neptune has a semi-major axis of 30 AU and 1999 OX3 has a semi-major axis of 32 AU. The Minor Planet Center (MPC) does not classify this object as a centaur because the MPC defines centaurs as having a semi-major axis of less than 30.066 AU. 1999 OX3 crosses the orbits of both Neptune and Uranus and has an inclination of only 2.62°. The Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES) defines centaurs using a dynamical classification scheme, based on the behavior of orbital integrations over 10 million years, the DES defines centaurs as nonresonant objects whose osculating perihelia are less than the osculating semimajor axis of Neptune at any time during the integration. Using the dynamical definition of a centaur, 1999 OX3 is a centaur.[4]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In July 2009, a rotational lightcurve of 1999 OX3 was obtained from photometric observations. Lightcurve analysis gave a rotation period of 9.26 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.11 magnitude (U=2). The period, however, is ambiguous with alternative solutions (13.4 and 15.45 hours).[2][7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Lellouch (2013) Summary figures for (44594) at LCDB referenced as 2013A&A...557...60L, not available at ADS

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 44594 (1999 OX3)" (2016-11-26 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "LCDB Data for (44594)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d Wm. Robert Johnston (15 October 2017). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 44594". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c "44594 (1999 OX3)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  6. ^ a b "Small Bodies Data Ferret". Nesvorny HCM Asteroid Families V3.0. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c Thirouin, A.; Ortiz, J. L.; Campo Bagatin, A.; Pravec, P.; Morales, N.; Hainaut, O.; Duffard, R. (August 2012). "Short-term variability of 10 trans-Neptunian objects". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 424 (4): 3156–3177. arXiv:1207.2044Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012MNRAS.424.3156T. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.21477.x. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  8. ^ Belskaya, Irina N.; Barucci, Maria A.; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Dovgopol, Anatolij N. (April 2015). "Updated taxonomy of trans-neptunian objects and centaurs: Influence of albedo". Icarus. 250: 482–491. Bibcode:2015Icar..250..482B. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2014.12.004. Retrieved 14 December 2016. 
  9. ^ Boehnhardt, H.; Schulz, D.; Protopapa, S.; Gö; tz, C. (November 2014). "Photometry of Transneptunian Objects for the Herschel Key Program `TNOs are Cool'". Earth. 114 (1-2): 35–57. Bibcode:2014EM&P..114...35B. doi:10.1007/s11038-014-9450-x. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  10. ^ Peixinho, N.; Delsanti, A.; Guilbert-Lepoutre, A.; Gafeira, R.; Lacerda, P. (October 2012). "The bimodal colors of Centaurs and small Kuiper belt objects". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 546: 12. arXiv:1206.3153Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012A&A...546A..86P. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219057. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 

External links[edit]