(472271) 2014 UM33

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(472271) 2014 UM33
Discovery [1]
Discovered by Mount Lemmon Survey (Pan-STARRS)
Discovery site Mount Lemmon
Discovery date 22 October 2014
Designations
MPC designation (472271) 2014 UM33
2014 UM33 · 2010 TQ182
TNO
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc 11.86 yr (4,332 days)
Aphelion 49.631 AU
Perihelion 36.163 AU
42.897 AU
Eccentricity 0.1570
280.96 yr (102,622 days)
269.23°
0° 0m 12.6s / day
Inclination 17.403°
236.58°
269.24°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 320–720 km[3]
478 km[4]
607 km[5]
220–880[6]
21–22
4.9[1][2]
5.2[4]

(472271) 2014 UM33, provisionally designated 2010 TQ182, is a trans-Neptunian object and possible dwarf planet residing in the outer Kuiper belt. It was discovered on October 22, 2014, by the Mount Lemmon Survey, its orbit was initially poorly determined, with 17 observations over 62 days, giving it an orbital uncertainty of 8. It is listed on Mike Brown's website as a probable dwarf planet, ranked 67th most likely.[4]

It is approximately the size of 2 Pallas in the asteroid belt, on August 18, 2015, 2014 UM33 was found to have been discovered over four years previously, with the designation 2010 TQ182. This extended its observation arc to over 4 years, and then precovery observations were found using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey from 2009.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "472271 (2014 UM33)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 25 October 2016. 
  2. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 472271 (2014 UM33)" (2015-08-26 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 25 October 2016. 
  3. ^ "Glossary: Absolute Magnitude (H)". JPL. NASA. Retrieved 2 January 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Brown, Mike. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". www.gps.caltech.edu. Caltech. Retrieved 21 July 2015. 
  5. ^ Wm. Robert Johnston (24 March 2015). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 21 July 2015. 
  6. ^ Bruton, Dan. "Conversion of Absolute Magnitude to Diameter". SFASU – Department of Physics and Astronomy. Archived from the original on 18 December 2008. Retrieved 18 August 2015. 

External links[edit]