(480808) 1994 XL1

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(480808) 1994 XL1
Discovery
Discovered by R. H. McNaught
Discovery site Siding Spring Obs.
Discovery date 6 December 1994
Designations
MPC designation (480808) 1994 XL1
1994 XL1
NEO · Aten · PHA[1]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 30 January 2013 (JD 2456322.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 21.99 yr (8,033 days)
Aphelion 1.0240 AU
Perihelion 0.3178 AU
0.6709 AU
Eccentricity 0.5263
0.55 yr (201 days)
205.64°
1° 47m 36.96s / day
Inclination 28.167°
252.68°
356.54°
Earth MOID 0.0365 AU · 14.2 LD
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 0.2 km (est. at 0.20[2]
20.9[1]

(480808) 1994 XL1 is a sub-kilometer asteroid, classified as near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid of the Aten group, approximately 200 meters in diameter. It was discovered on 6 December 1994, by Scottish-Australian astronomer Robert McNaught at Siding Spring Observatory in Australia,[3] it was one of the first asteroids discovered to have a semi-major axis less than Venus.[citation needed]

Orbit and classification[edit]

1994 XL1 orbits the Sun at a distance of 0.3–1.0 AU once every 0 years and 7 months (201 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.53 and an inclination of 28° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] No precoveries were taken, and no prior identifications were made, the body's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation.[3]

Close encoutner[edit]

The asteroid has an Earth minimum orbital intersection distance of 0.0365 AU (5,460,000 km), which translates into 14.2 lunar distances.[1] It passed 0.03709 AU (5,550,000 km) from Earth on 6 December 1994.[4] On 4 December 2044, it will pass again at 0.03637 AU (5,440,000 km) from Earth.[4]

Physical characteristics[edit]

1994 XL1 has not been observed by any of the space-based surveys such as the Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRAS, the Japanese Akari satellite, and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission. Based on a generic magnitude-to-diameter conversion, 1994 XL1 measures approximately 0.2 kilometers in diameter assuming an albedo of 0.20, which is a typical value for stony S-type asteroids.[2]

As of 2017, no rotational lightcurve of this object has been obtained, the body's rotation period, shape and poles remain unknown.[5]

Naming and numbering[edit]

After its first observation in 1994, this minor planet was numbered 23 year later by the Minor Planet Center on 12 January 2017 (M.P.C. 112958),[6]:698 after its last observation with the LCO–A 1-meter global telescope station at Sutherland, South Africa, on 6 December 2016 (K91). It has not been named yet.[1][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 480808 (1994 XL1)" (2016-12-06 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 1 August 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Asteroid Size Estimator". CNEOS/JPL. Retrieved 1 August 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c "480808 (1994 XL1)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 1 August 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "JPL Close-Approach Data: (1994 XL1)" (2011-12-17 last obs (arc=17.03 years)). Retrieved 2013-01-23. 
  5. ^ "LCDB Data for (480808)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 1 August 2017. 
  6. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 1 August 2017. 

External links[edit]