(52760) 1998 ML14

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(52760) 1998 ML14
Discovery [1]
Discovered by LINEAR
Discovery site Lincoln Lab's ETS
Discovery date 24 June 1998
Designations
MPC designation (52760) 1998 ML14
1998 ML14
NEO · Apollo[1][2] · PHA[1][2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 15.54 yr (5,676 days)
Aphelion 3.9104 AU
Perihelion 0.9071 AU
2.4088 AU
Eccentricity 0.6234
3.74 yr (1,366 days)
21.557°
0° 15m 48.96s / day
Inclination 2.4274°
338.72°
20.324°
Earth MOID 0.0167 AU · 6.5 LD
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 1.0±0.05 km[3]
0.81±0.16 km[4]
1.17 km (derived)[5]
14.98±0.06 h[6]
14.98±0.06 h[7]
14.28±0.01 h[8]
0.27±0.24[4]
0.20 (assumed)[5]
S (Tholen)[5]
16.93±0.01[7] · 17.02[5][6] · 17.5[1]

(52760) 1998 ML14, provisional designation 1998 ML14, is a stony asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Apollo group and potentially hazardous asteroid, approximately 1 kilometer in diameter. It was discovered on 24 June 1998, by the LINEAR survey at the Lincoln Laboratory's Experimental Test Site in Socorro, New Mexico.[2]

Description[edit]

1998 ML14 orbits the Sun at a distance of 0.9–3.9 AU once every 3 years and 9 months (1,366 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.62 and an inclination of 2° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] It is also a Mars-crossing asteroid.

Shortly after its discovery, 1998 ML14 was imaged by radar at Goldstone and Arecibo.[9]

The study showed that the asteroid has a rotation period of 15 hours, and a shape that is roughly spherical, with some steep protrusions and large craters.[6][7][8]

On August 24, 2013 it passed at a distance of 21.9 Lunar distances.[1] It was hoped to be observed by Goldstone radar.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 52760 (1998 ML14)" (2014-01-07 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c "52760 (1998 ML14)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  3. ^ Ostro, Steven J.; Hudson, R. Scott; Benner, Lance A. M.; Nolan, Michael C.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Scheeres, Daniel J.; et al. (September 2001). "Radar observations of asteroid 1998 ML14". Meteoritics and Planetary Science: 1225–1236. Bibcode:2001M&PS...36.1225O. doi:10.1111/j.1945-5100.2001.tb01956.x. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Mueller, Michael; Delbo', M.; Hora, J. L.; Trilling, D. E.; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; et al. (April 2011). "ExploreNEOs. III. Physical Characterization of 65 Potential Spacecraft Target Asteroids". The Astronomical Journal. 141 (4): 9. Bibcode:2011AJ....141..109M. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/141/4/109. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (52760)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c Hicks, M. D.; Weissman, P. R.; Rabinowitz, D. L.; Chamberlin, A. B.; Buratti, B. J.; Lee, C. O. (September 1998). "Close Encounters: Observations of the Earth-crossing Asteroids 1998 KY26 and 1998 ML14". American Astronomical Society. 30: 1029. Bibcode:1998DPS....30.1006H. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c Hicks, M.; Weissman, P. (August 1998). "1998 ML_14". IAU Circ. (6987). Bibcode:1998IAUC.6987....1H. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  8. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (April 2014). "Near-Earth Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2013 September-December". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 41 (2): 113–124. Bibcode:2014MPBu...41..113W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 23 October 2017. 
  9. ^ "NEA CIRCULAR POLARIZATION RATIO RANKING". Asteroid Radar Research. 11 April 2006. Retrieved 15 December 2009. 
  10. ^ Goldstone radar

External links[edit]