(7482) 1994 PC1

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(7482) 1994 PC1
1994 PC1 orbit 2022.png
Orbit and positions on 1 January 2019
Discovery [1]
Discovered byR. H. McNaught
Discovery siteSiding Spring Obs.
Discovery date9 August 1994
Designations
MPC designation(7482) 1994 PC1
1994 PC1
Apollo · NEO · PHA[1][2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc41.97 yr (15,331 days)
Aphelion1.7882 AU
Perihelion0.9042 AU
1.3462 AU
Eccentricity0.3283
1.56 yr (571 days)
47.475°
0° 37m 51.6s / day
Inclination33.487°
117.89°
47.625°
Earth MOID0.0010 AU (0.4 LD)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions1.052±0.303 km[3][3]
1.30 km (calculated)[4]
2.5999 h[5]
0.20 (assumed)[4]
0.277±0.185[3][3]
SMASS = S[1][4]
16.8[1][4] · 16.80±0.3[3]

(7482) 1994 PC1 is a stony asteroid, classified as near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid of the Apollo group, approximately 1.1 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 9 August 1994, by astronomer Robert McNaught at the Siding Spring Observatory in Coonabarabran, Australia.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

1994 PC1 orbits the Sun at a distance of 0.9–1.8 AU once every 1 years and 7 months (571 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.33 and an inclination of 33° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

On 17 January 1933, it passed 0.00752 AU (1,125,000 km; 699,000 mi) from Earth. On 18 January 2022, it will pass 0.01324 AU (1,981,000 km; 1,231,000 mi) from Earth.[1]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In the SMASS classification, 1994 PC1 is a common stony S-type asteroid.[1][4]

Rotation period[edit]

In 1998, a rotational lightcurve of 1994 PC1 was obtained from photometric observations by Petr Pravec. Lightcurve analysis gave a well-defined rotation period of 2.5999 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.29 magnitude (U=3).[5]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the survey carried out by the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, 1994 PC1 measures 1.052 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo of 0.277.[3] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes an albedo of 0.20 and calculates a diameter of 1.30 kilometers based on an absolute magnitude of 16.8.[4]

2022 flyby[edit]

On January 19, 2022, (7482) 1994 PC1 will pass just outside of 3 lunar distances of the earth, with a peak magnitude of 7-8.

Sky trajectory with hourly motion
1994 PC1 skypath 2022.png
History of close approaches of large near-Earth objects since 1908 (A)
PHA Date Approach distance in lunar distances Abs. mag
(H)
Diameter (C)
(m)
Ref (D)
Nominal(B) Minimum Maximum
(33342) 1998 WT24 1908-12-16 3.542 3.537 3.547 17.9 556–1795 data
(458732) 2011 MD5 1918-09-17 0.911 0.909 0.913 17.9 556–1795 data
(7482) 1994 PC1 1933-01-17 2.927 2.927 2.928 16.8 749–1357 data
69230 Hermes 1937-10-30 1.926 1.926 1.927 17.5 668–2158 data
69230 Hermes 1942-04-26 1.651 1.651 1.651 17.5 668–2158 data
(137108) 1999 AN10 1946-08-07 2.432 2.429 2.435 17.9 556–1795 data
(33342) 1998 WT24 1956-12-16 3.523 3.523 3.523 17.9 556–1795 data
(163243) 2002 FB3 1961-04-12 4.903 4.900 4.906 16.4 1669–1695 data
(192642) 1999 RD32 1969-08-27 3.627 3.625 3.630 16.3 1161–3750 data
(143651) 2003 QO104 1981-05-18 2.761 2.760 2.761 16.0 1333–4306 data
2017 CH1 1992-06-05 4.691 3.391 6.037 17.9 556–1795 data
(170086) 2002 XR14 1995-06-24 4.259 4.259 4.260 18.0 531–1714 data
(33342) 1998 WT24 2001-12-16 4.859 4.859 4.859 17.9 556–1795 data
4179 Toutatis 2004-09-29 4.031 4.031 4.031 15.30 2440–2450 data
2014 JO25 2017-04-19 4.573 4.573 4.573 17.8 582–1879 data
(137108) 1999 AN10 2027-08-07 1.014 1.010 1.019 17.9 556–1795 data
(35396) 1997 XF11 2028-10-26 2.417 2.417 2.418 16.9 881–2845 data
(154276) 2002 SY50 2071-10-30 3.415 3.412 3.418 17.6 714–1406 data
(164121) 2003 YT1 2073-04-29 4.409 4.409 4.409 16.2 1167–2267 data
(385343) 2002 LV 2076-08-04 4.184 4.183 4.185 16.6 1011–3266 data
(52768) 1998 OR2 2079-04-16 4.611 4.611 4.612 15.8 1462–4721 data
(33342) 1998 WT24 2099-12-18 4.919 4.919 4.919 17.9 556–1795 data
(85182) 1991 AQ 2130-01-27 4.140 4.139 4.141 17.1 1100 data
314082 Dryope 2186-07-16 3.709 2.996 4.786 17.5 668–2158 data
(137126) 1999 CF9 2192-08-21 4.970 4.967 4.973 18.0 531–1714 data
(290772) 2005 VC 2198-05-05 1.951 1.791 2.134 17.6 638–2061 data
(A) This list includes near-Earth approaches of less than 5 lunar distances (LD) of objects with H brighter than 18.
(B) Nominal geocentric distance from the center of Earth to the center of the object (Earth has a radius of approximately 6,400 km).
(C) Diameter: estimated, theoretical mean-diameter based on H and albedo range between X and Y.
(D) Reference: data source from the JPL SBDB, with AU converted into LD (1 AU≈390 LD)
(E) Color codes:   unobserved at close approach   observed during close approach   upcoming approaches

Naming[edit]

As of 2018, this minor planet has not been named.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 7482 (1994 PC1)" (2016-09-12 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2 November 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "7482 (1994 PC1)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2 November 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; McMillan, R. S.; et al. (November 2012). "Physical Parameters of Asteroids Estimated from the WISE 3-Band Data and NEOWISE Post-Cryogenic Survey" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 760 (1): 6. arXiv:1210.0502. Bibcode:2012ApJ...760L..12M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/760/1/L12. Retrieved 3 February 2018.
  4. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (7482)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 2 November 2017.
  5. ^ a b Pravec, Petr; Wolf, Marek; Sarounová, Lenka (November 1998). "Lightcurves of 26 Near-Earth Asteroids". Icarus. 136 (1): 124–153. Bibcode:1998Icar..136..124P. doi:10.1006/icar.1998.5993. Retrieved 2 November 2017.

External links[edit]