(78799) 2002 XW93

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(78799) 2002 XW93
Discovery [1]
Discovered by Palomar team
Discovery site Palomar Obs.
Discovery date 10 December 2002
Designations
MPC designation (78799) 2002 XW93
2002 XW93
TNO[1]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 4
Observation arc 18.76 yr (6,852 days)
Earliest precovery date 17 December 1989
Aphelion 46.785 AU
Perihelion 28.065 AU
37.425 AU
Eccentricity 0.2501
228.96 yr (83,626 days)
143.11°
0° 0m 15.48s / day
Inclination 14.389°
46.951°
247.07°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 565 km[2]
584 km[3]
5.5[1]

(78799) 2002 XW93 is a trans-Neptunian object from the outer Solar System, approximately 550–600 kilometers (340–370 mi) in diameter. It was discovered by and at the U.S Palomar Observatory, California, on 10 December 2002.[4] According to American astronomer Michael Brown, the minor planet is a likely dwarf planet.[3]

Orbit and physical characteristics[edit]

The minor planet orbits the Sun at a distance of 28.1–46.8 AU once every 228 years and 12 months (83,626 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.25 and an inclination of 14° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] A first precovery was taken at Palomar in 1989, and published by the Digitized Sky Survey, extends the asteroid's observation arc by 13 years prior to its official discovery observation.[4]

As of 2016, after a total of 29 observations, its orbital uncertainty parameter is at 3. Its last observation was made by the Hubble Space Telescope in September 2008.[4] On 10 August 1926, it most recently reached perihelion, when it was nearest to the Sun.[5][4] It is a near 5:7 resonant trans-Neptunian object.[citation needed]

Numbering and naming[edit]

This minor planet was numbered by the Minor Planet Center on 15 April 2004.[6] As of 2018, it has not been named.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 78799 (2002 XW93)" (2008-09-20 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 1 June 2017. 
  2. ^ "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 2015-01-02. 
  3. ^ a b "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system?". Retrieved 2015-01-02. 
  4. ^ a b c d e "78799 (2002 XW93)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 26 May 2016. 
  5. ^ Marsden, Brian G. (2003-12-24). "MPEC 2003-Y55 : 2002 XW93". IAU Minor Planet Center. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Retrieved 2015-01-02. 
  6. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 24 February 2018. 

External links[edit]