(79983) 1999 DF9

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(79983) 1999 DF9
Discovery [1]
Discovered by J. X. Luu
C. Trujillo
D. C. Jewitt
Discovery site Kitt Peak National Obs.
Discovery date 20 February 1999
Designations
MPC designation (79983) 1999 DF9
1999 DF9
TNO[1] · cubewano[2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 2
Observation arc 17.06 yr (6,231 days)
Aphelion 53.567 AU
Perihelion 39.830 AU
46.698 AU
Eccentricity 0.1471
319.12 yr (116,560 days)
19.489°
0° 0m 11.16s / day
Inclination 9.8105°
334.84°
178.63°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 265.17 km (calculated)[3]
278 km[2]
6.65 h[4]
0.10 (assumed)[3]
C[3]
B–V = 0.920±0.060[5]
V–R = 0.710±0.050[5]
V–I = 1.360±0.060[5]
5.797±0.110 (R)[6] · 6.0[1][3]

(79983) 1999 DF9 is a trans-Neptunian object of the Kuiper belt, classified as a non-resonant cubewano, that measures approximately 270 kilometers in diameter.

Discovery[edit]

It was discovered on 20 February 1999, by American and British astronomers Jane Luu, Chad Trujillo and David C. Jewitt at the U.S. Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona.[7] As no precoveries were taken, the minor planet's observation arc begins with its discovery observation in 1999.[7]

Classification and orbit[edit]

The carbonaceous minor planet is a classical Kuiper belt object or "cubewano", which are not in an orbital resonance with Neptune and do not cross the giant planet's orbit, it orbits the Sun at a distance of 39.8–53.6 AU once every 319 years and 1 month (116,560 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.15 and an inclination of 10° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] This makes it a relatively eccentric body for a classical Kuiper belt object, which typically have low-eccentricities of 0.10 or less.

Physical characteristics[edit]

In February 2001, a rotational lightcurve was published for this minor planet from photometric observations by Portuguese astronomer Pedro Lacerda and the discovering astronomer Jane Luu. Lightcurve analysis gave a relatively short rotation period of 6.65 hours with a brightness variation of 0.40 magnitude (U=2).[4]

The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes a low albedo of 0.10 and calculates a mean-diameter of 265.2 kilometers, based on an absolute magnitude of 6.0,[3] while the Johnston's archive give a diameter of 278 kilometers.[2] Due to its small size, it is unlikely to be classified as a dwarf planet.

Naming[edit]

As of 2017, this minor planet remains unnamed.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 79983 (1999 DF9)" (2016-03-13 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 1 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Robert Johnston (5 September 2016). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 25 April 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (79983)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 31 August 2016. 
  4. ^ a b Lacerda, Pedro; Luu, Jane (April 2006). "Analysis of the Rotational Properties of Kuiper Belt Objects" (PDF). The Astronomical Journal. 131 (4): 2314–2326. arXiv:astro-ph/0601257Freely accessible. Bibcode:2006AJ....131.2314L. doi:10.1086/501047. Retrieved 31 August 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c Hainaut, O. R.; Boehnhardt, H.; Protopapa, S. (October 2012). "Colours of minor bodies in the outer solar system. II. A statistical analysis revisited". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 546: 20. arXiv:1209.1896Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012A&A...546A.115H. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219566. Retrieved 31 August 2016. 
  6. ^ Peixinho, N.; Delsanti, A.; Guilbert-Lepoutre, A.; Gafeira, R.; Lacerda, P. (October 2012). "The bimodal colors of Centaurs and small Kuiper belt objects" (PDF). Astronomy and Astrophysics. 546: 12. arXiv:1206.3153Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012A&A...546A..86P. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219057. Retrieved 31 August 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c "79983 (1999 DF9)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 31 August 2016. 

External links[edit]