(82075) 2000 YW134

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(82075) 2000 YW134
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Kitt Peak
Discovery date 26 December 2000
Designations
MPC designation (82075) 2000 YW134
3:8 resonance?[2]
Detached?
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc 5546 days (15.18 yr)
Aphelion 75.202 AU (11.2501 Tm) (Q)
Perihelion 41.238 AU (6.1691 Tm) (q)
58.220 AU (8.7096 Tm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.29169 (e)
444.24 yr (162257 d)
29.643° (M)
0° 0m 7.987s / day (n)
Inclination 19.7774° (i)
126.9457° (Ω)
317.10° (ω)
Known satellites S/2005 (82075) 1[3]
(≈237 km in diameter)
Earth MOID 40.2806 AU (6.02589 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 36.2543 AU (5.42357 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions ≈455 km[4]
<500 km[5]
>0.08[5]
B−V=0.92;
V−R=0.55[6]
≈21.5[7]
4.74,[6] 4.9[1]

(82075) 2000 YW134, provisionally known as 2000 YW134, is a binary trans-Neptunian object (TNO). It is likely in 3:8 resonance with Neptune or possibly a detached object.

Physical characteristics[edit]

Assuming a generic TNO albedo of 0.09, the primary is about 431 kilometres (268 mi) in diameter with its secondary at 237 kilometres (147 mi) in diameter.[3][4] In 2010, (82075) 2000 YW134 was observed by the Herschel Space Telescope in the far-infrared. No thermal radiation has been detected, which allowed astronomers to place an upper limit on its size; the single-object diameter should be less than 500 kilometres (310 mi).[5]

In the visible part of the spectrum, the surface of (82075) 2000 YW134 is moderately red.[6]

Classifications[edit]

Possible dwarf planet

With a generically estimated diameter of 430 kilometres (270 mi), (82075) 2000 YW134 is a possible dwarf planet.[8]

Uncertain category

(82075) 2000 YW134 currently has a perihelion distance of 41 astronomical units (AU).[1] In 2006, Lykawka, using a 4–5 Gyr integration, indicated that (82075) 2000 YW134 is a detached object with perihelion larger than 40 AU. However, the Deep Ecliptic Survey, using a 10My integration (last observation: 2007-11-10), shows it to be in 3:8 resonance with Neptune, with a minimum perihelion distance of 38.1 AU.[2] In 2007, Emel’yanenko and Kiseleva showed an 84% probability that it is in the 3:8 resonance.[9]

Satellite[edit]

The moon of (82075) 2000 YW134 is relatively large compared to the primary, because the moon is only 1.3 magnitudes fainter than the primary.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 82075 (2000 YW134)" (last observation: 2007-11-10). Retrieved 7 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 82075" (last observation: 2008-11-10 using 77 of 78 observations over 7.9 years). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2014-10-13. 
  3. ^ a b Wm. Robert Johnston (2006-03-04). "(82075) 2000 YW134". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 2009-10-07. 
  4. ^ a b Wm. Robert Johnston (5 July 2013). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  5. ^ a b c Muller, T.G.; Lellouch, E.; Stansberry, J.; et al. (2010). ""TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region I. Results from the Herschel science demonstration phase (SDP)". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 518: L146. arXiv:1005.2923Freely accessible. Bibcode:2010A&A...518L.146M. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201014683. 
  6. ^ a b c Stephen C. Tegler. "Kuiper Belt Object Magnitudes and Surface Color". Retrieved August 1, 2010. 
  7. ^ "AstDyS (82075) 2000YW134 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2009-10-06. 
  8. ^ Mike Brown. "The Dwarf Planets". Retrieved 2009-10-07. 
  9. ^ Emel’yanenko, V. V; Kiseleva, E. L. (2008). "Resonant motion of trans-Neptunian objects in high-eccentricity orbits". Astronomy Letters. 34 (4): 271–279. Bibcode:2008AstL...34..271E. doi:10.1134/S1063773708040075. 
  10. ^ Stephens, Denise C.; Noll, Keith S. (2006). "Detection of Six Transneptunian Binaries with NICMOS: A High Fraction of Binaries in the Cold Classical Disk". Astronomical Journal. 131 (2): 1142–1148. arXiv:astro-ph/0510130Freely accessible. Bibcode:2006AJ....131.1142S. doi:10.1086/498715. 

External links[edit]