89 Julia

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89 Julia
89Julia (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 89 Julia based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Édouard Stephan
Discovery date 6 August 1866
Designations
MPC designation (89) Julia
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 149.68 yr (54672 d)
Aphelion 3.0202 AU (451.82 Gm)
Perihelion 2.08017 AU (311.189 Gm)
2.55016 AU (381.499 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.18430
4.07 yr (1487.5 d)
255.367°
0° 14m 31.272s / day
Inclination 16.128°
311.563°
45.461°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 151.46±3.1 km[1]
147.57 ± 8.32 km[2]
Mass (6.71 ± 1.82) × 1018 kg[2]
Mean density
3.98 ± 1.27 g/cm3[2]
11.387 h (0.4745 d)[1]
11.387 ± 0.002 h[3]
0.1764±0.007[1]
0.176 [4]
S
8.74 to 12.61[5]
6.60
0.18" to 0.052"

89 Julia is a large main-belt asteroid that was discovered by French astronomer Édouard Stephan on August 6, 1866. This was first of his two asteroid discoveries; the other was 91 Aegina. 89 Julia is believed to be named after Saint Julia of Corsica. A stellar occultation by Julia was observed on December 20, 1985.

The spectrum of 89 Julia shows the signature of silicate rich minerals with possible indications of an abundant calcic clinopyroxene component, it is classified as an S-type asteroid.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Yeomans, Donald K., "89 Julia", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 13 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336Freely accessible, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ a b Birlan, Mirel; Barucci, Maria Antonietta; Vernazza, Pierre; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Binzel, Richard P.; Bus, Schelte J.; et al. (June 2004). "Near-IR spectroscopy of asteroids 21 Lutetia, 89 Julia, 140 Siwa, 2181 Fogelin and 5480 (1989YK8), potential targets for the Rosetta mission; remote observations campaign on IRTF" (PDF). New Astronomy. 9 (5): 343–351. arXiv:astro-ph/0312638Freely accessible. Bibcode:2004NewA....9..343B. doi:10.1016/j.newast.2003.12.005. Retrieved 2 November 2017. 
  4. ^ Asteroid Data Sets Archived 2010-01-17 at WebCite
  5. ^ "AstDys (89) Julia Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2010-06-27. 

External links[edit]