95 Arethusa

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95 Arethusa
95Arethusa (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 95 Arethusa based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Karl Theodor Robert Luther
Discovery date 23 November 1867
Designations
MPC designation (95) Arethusa
Pronunciation /ˌærəˈθjzə/
ARR-ə-THEW-zə
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 143.53 yr (52424 d)
Aphelion 3.53176 AU (528.344 Gm)
Perihelion 2.59737 AU (388.561 Gm)
3.06457 AU (458.453 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.15245
5.36 yr (1959.5 d)
16.91 km/s
250.185°
0° 11m 1.385s / day
Inclination 12.9955°
243.038°
154.196°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 136.04±10.1 km[1]
136.04 km
147 ± 32 km [2]
Mass 2.6×1018 kg
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0380 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0719 km/s
8.705 h (0.3627 d)
0.0698±0.012[1]
0.070 [3]
C
8.0

95 Arethusa (/ˌærəˈθjzə/ ARR-ə-THEW-zə) is a large main-belt asteroid. Its coloring is dark, its composition carbonaceous and primitive, it was discovered by Robert Luther on November 23, 1867, and named after one of the various Arethusas in Greek mythology. Arethusa has been observed occulting a star three times: first on February 2, 1998, and twice in January 2003.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "95 Arethusa". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ Ďurech, Josef; Kaasalainen, Mikko; Herald, David; Dunham, David; Timerson, Brad; Hanuš, Josef; et al. (2011). "Combining asteroid models derived by lightcurve inversion with asteroidal occultation silhouettes" (PDF). Icarus. 214 (2): 652–670. arXiv:1104.4227Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011Icar..214..652D. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.03.016. 
  3. ^ Asteroid Data Sets Archived 2010-01-17 at WebCite

External links[edit]