(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet

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"(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet"
(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet.jpg
Single by Blues Magoos
from the album Psychedelic Lollipop
B-side "Gotta Get Away"
Released October 1966 (1966-10)
Format 7-inch single
Genre
Length 2:10
Label Mercury
Songwriter(s)
  • Ron Gilbert
  • Ralph Scala
  • Mike Esposito
Producer(s)
  • Bob Wyld
  • Art Polhemus
Blues Magoos singles chronology
"Tobacco Road"
(1966)
"(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet"
(1966)
"Pipe Dream"
(1967)
"Tobacco Road"
(1966)
"(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet"
(1966)
"Pipe Dream"
(1967)

"(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet" is a song by the American rock band Blues Magoos, released in October 1966.[2] It was a chart hit in the United States in February 1967, it was written by Ron Gilbert, Ralph Scala and Mike Esposito. The Vox Continental organ riff was closely based on guitarist James Burton's riff to Ricky Nelson's 1962 rock recording of the old George Gershwin standard "Summertime".[3] The Blues Magoos' psychedelic song had also inspired Deep Purple's 1970 hit song "Black Night".[4]

Charts[edit]

Chart (1967) Position
Billboard Pop Singles 5

The Spectres version[edit]

"(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet"
Single by The Spectres
Released 10 February 1967 (1967-02-10)
Format Vinyl
Genre Rock
Length 2:18
Label Piccadilly
Songwriter(s) Gilbert/Scala/Esposito
Producer(s) John Schroeder
The Spectres singles chronology
"Hurdy Gurdy Man"
(1966)
"(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet"
(1967)
"Almost But Not Quite There"
(1967)
"Hurdy Gurdy Man"
(1966)
"(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet"
(1967)
"Almost But Not Quite There"
(1967)

"(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet" is a single released by the British Rock band The Spectres (a predecessor of Status Quo) in 1967.[5]

Track listing[edit]

  1. "(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet" (Gilbert/Scala/Esposito) (2.18)
  2. "I Want It" (Lynes/Coghlan/Rossi/Lancaster) (3.01)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Fontenot, Robert. "Garage Rock's 10 Biggest Hits of All Time". About.com. Retrieved February 26, 2017. 
  2. ^ Stuart Rosenberg (September 28, 2009). Rock and Roll and the American Landscape: The Birth of an Industry and the Expansion of the Popular Culture, 1955-1969. iUniverse. p. 112. ISBN 9781440164583. 
  3. ^ Reid, Graham (4 March 2011). "BLUES MAGOOS 1966-68: Pop's psychedelic pioneers". Elsewhere. 
  4. ^ Smith, Sid (2007-04-18). "Deep Purple In Rock Review". BBC Music. 
  5. ^ "Status Quo discography". statusquo.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2010-04-07. Retrieved 2010-01-04. 

External links[edit]