(120132) 2003 FY128

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
(120132) 2003 FY128
Discovery
Discovered by NEAT
Discovery date 26 March 2003
Designations
MPC designation (120132) 2003 FY128
none
detached object[1]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc 8159 days (22.34 yr)
Aphelion 62.551 AU (9.3575 Tm)
Perihelion 37.066 AU (5.5450 Tm)
49.809 AU (7.4513 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.25584
351.53 yr (128397 d)
28.257°
0° 0m 10.094s / day
Inclination 11.757°
341.68°
175.26°
Earth MOID 36.0755 AU (5.39682 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 31.6621 AU (4.73658 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 460±21 km[3]
8.54 h (0.356 d)
0.079±0.010[3]
4.8[2]

(120132) 2003 FY128, also written as (120132) 2003 FY128, is a trans-Neptunian object (TNO).

Detached[edit]

It is classified as a detached object by the Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES), since its orbit appears to be beyond the current control of Neptune.[1] Though, if Neptune migrated outward, there would have been a period when Neptune had a higher eccentricity.

It was discovered on March 26, 2003 by the NEAT program at the Palomar Observatory, California.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Marc W. Buie (2006-04-02). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 120132". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-01-22. 
  2. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 120132 (2003 FY128)" (last observation: 2006-04-02). Retrieved 7 April 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Santos-Sanz, P., Lellouch, E., Fornasier, S., Kiss, C., Pal, A., Müller, T. G., Vilenius, E., Stansberry, J., Mommert, M., Delsanti, A., Mueller, M., Peixinho, N., Henry, F., Ortiz, J. L., Thirouin, A., Protopapa, S., Duffard, R., Szalai, N., Lim, T., Ejeta, C., Hartogh, P., Harris, A. W., & Rengel, M. (2012). “TNOs are Cool”: A Survey of the Transneptunian Region IV - Size/albedo characterization of 15 scattered disk and detached objects observed with Herschel Space Observatory-PACS

External links[edit]