(24835) 1995 SM55

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(24835) 1995 SM55
Discovery [1][2]
Discovered by N. Danzl
Discovery site Spacewatch
Kitt Peak National Obs.
Discovery date 19 September 1995
Designations
MPC designation (24835) 1995 SM55
1995 SM55
TNO[1] · Haumea[3] · cubewano[4][5]
Scat-Ext[6] · distant[2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc 34.29 yr (12,523 days)
Aphelion 45.870 AU
Perihelion 37.386 AU
41.628 AU
Eccentricity 0.1019
268.59 yr (98,101 days)
329.45°
0° 0m 13.32s / day
Inclination 27.096°
21.109°
72.600°
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
173 km (estimate)[3]
519.43 km (derived)[7]
610 km (Haumea-derived)[8]
701 km[4]
704 km (upper limit)[9][10]
8.08±0.02 h[11]
8.08±0.03 h[12]
0.040[4]
0.067 (at least)[9]
0.07 (Haumea-derived)[3]
0.10 (assumed)[7]
BBb (suspected)[13] · C[7]
(Neutral)
B–V = 0.65[7]
V−R = 0.37[7]
V−I = 0.710[7]
4.30±0.02 (R)[14]
4.352±0.040 (R)[15]
4.490±0.030[16]
4.54[7][17] · 4.6[1] · 4.9[3]

(24835) 1995 SM55, provisional designation 1995 SM55, is a trans-Neptunian object and member of the Haumea family that resides in the Kuiper belt, located in the outermost region of the Solar System. It was discovered on 19 September 1995, by American astronomer Nichole Danzl of the Spacewatch program at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, Arizona, in the United States.[2] It measures approximately 600–700 kilometers in diameter and was the second-largest known object in the Kuiper belt, after Pluto, until 1996 TO66 was discovered.

Origin[edit]

1995 SM55 is a member of the Haumea family.[3] It has the highest collisional velocity, a δv of 123.3 m/s, of all confirmed members.[18] Based on their common pattern of IR water-ice absorptions, neutral visible spectrum[19] and the clustering of their orbital elements, the other KBOs 1996 TO66, 2002 TX300, 2003 OP32 and 2005 RR43 all appear to be collisional fragments broken off of the dwarf planet Haumea.

Naming[edit]

As of 2018, this minor planet has not been named by the Minor Planet Center.[2]

Orbital diagram[edit]

1995 SM55 among other members of the Haumea family

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 24835 (1995 SM55)" (2016-12-29 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  2. ^ a b c d "24835 (1995 SM55)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system?". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  4. ^ a b c Johnston, Wm. Robert (15 October 2017). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  5. ^ "MPEC 2009-R09 :Distant Minor Planets (2009 SEPT. 16.0 TT)". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2009-09-04. Retrieved 2009-10-04. 
  6. ^ Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 24835" (2004-11-02 using 119 of 123 observations). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-10-04. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g "LCDB Data for (24835)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  8. ^ "Asteroid Size Estimator". CNEOS NASA/JPL. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  9. ^ a b Grundy, W. M.; Noll, K. S.; Stephens, D. C. (July 2005). "Diverse albedos of small trans-neptunian objects" (PDF). Icarus. 176 (1): 184–191. arXiv:astro-ph/0502229Freely accessible. Bibcode:2005Icar..176..184G. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.01.007. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  10. ^ John Stansberry; Will Grundy; Mike Brown; Dale Cruikshank; John Spencer; David Trilling; et al. (2007). "Physical Properties of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects: Constraints from Spitzer Space Telescope". arXiv:astro-ph/0702538Freely accessible [astro-ph]. 
  11. ^ Thirouin, Audrey; Sheppard, Scott S.; Noll, Keith S.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Ortiz, Jose Luis; Doressoundiram, Alain (June 2016). "Rotational Properties of the Haumea Family Members and Candidates: Short-term Variability". The Astronomical Journal. 151 (6): 20. arXiv:1603.04406Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016AJ....151..148T. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/151/6/148. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  12. ^ Sheppard, Scott S.; Jewitt, David C. (June 2003). "Hawaii Kuiper Belt Variability Project: An Update". Earth. 92 (1): 207–219. Bibcode:2003EM&P...92..207S. doi:10.1023/B:MOON.0000031943.12968.46. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  13. ^ Belskaya, Irina N.; Barucci, Maria A.; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Dovgopol, Anatolij N. (April 2015). "Updated taxonomy of trans-neptunian objects and centaurs: Influence of albedo". Icarus. 250: 482–491. Bibcode:2015Icar..250..482B. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2014.12.004. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  14. ^ Jewitt, David; Peixinho, Nuno; Hsieh, Henry H. (November 2007). "U-Band Photometry of Kuiper Belt Objects". The Astronomical Journal. 134 (5): 2046–2053. Bibcode:2007AJ....134.2046J. doi:10.1086/522787. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  15. ^ Peixinho, N.; Delsanti, A.; Guilbert-Lepoutre, A.; Gafeira, R.; Lacerda, P. (October 2012). "The bimodal colors of Centaurs and small Kuiper belt objects". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 546: 12. arXiv:1206.3153Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012A&A...546A..86P. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219057. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  16. ^ Rabinowitz, David L.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Schaefer, Martha; Tourtellotte, Suzanne W. (October 2008). "The Youthful Appearance of the 2003 EL61 Collisional Family" (PDF). The Astronomical Journal. 136 (4): 1502–1509. arXiv:0804.2864Freely accessible. Bibcode:2008AJ....136.1502R. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/136/4/1502. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  17. ^ Romanishin, W.; Tegler, S. C. (December 2005). "Accurate absolute magnitudes for Kuiper belt objects and Centaurs". Icarus. 179 (2): 523–526. Bibcode:2005Icar..179..523R. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.06.016. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  18. ^ Snodgrass, C.; Carry, B.; Dumas, C.; Hainaut, O. (February 2010). "Characterisation of candidate members of (136108) Haumea's family" (PDF). Astronomy and Astrophysics. 511: 9. arXiv:0912.3171Freely accessible. Bibcode:2010A&A...511A..72S. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/200913031. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  19. ^ Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Licandro, J.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Brunetto, R. (June 2007). "The water ice rich surface of (145453) 2005 RR43: a case for a carbon-depleted population of TNOs?". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 468 (1): L25. arXiv:astro-ph/0703098Freely accessible. Bibcode:2007A&A...468L..25P. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20077294. 

External links[edit]