-Hay (place name element)

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Floyer Hayes shown on a 1765 map of the City of Exeter, Devon, by Benjamin Donn. Many open spaces around the outside of the City walls are shown as suffixed "Hay", such as Shill Hay, Southern Hay, Northern Hay, Fryers Hay, Bon Hay

-hay (also hays, hayes, etc.) is a . It derives from the Old English word hege[1] or haga,[2] Middle English heie,[3] in Icelandic hagi,[4] meaning "an enclosed field", and is from the same root as the English word "hedge", a structure which surrounds and encloses an area of land,[5] from the Norman-French haie, "a hedge". Haw (from O.E. haga) and Hay (from O.E. hege) are cognate and both mean "hedge".[6]

Examples[edit]

  • Cheslyn Hay, Walsall, meaning "a fenced or hedged enclosure", here perhaps around an ancient cromlech or burial-mound.[7]
  • Pipe Hayes ("hedges"), Erdington.[8]

Devon[edit]

Exeter[edit]

In the vicinity of Exeter:
Floyer Hayes, Northern Hay, Southern Hay, Shill Hay, Fryers Hay, Bon Hay, all surrounding the City of Exeter, Devon;

Tiverton[edit]

In the vicinity of Tiverton:
Moor Hayes, Cullompton; Passmore Hayes; Buck Hayes; Rashleigh Hayes; Gorn Hay; Wid Hayes; Moor Hayes, Washf

See also[edit]

Sources[edit]

  • Johnston, Rev. James B., The Place-Names of England and Wales, London, 1915, p. 147 [2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Johnston, p.196
  2. ^ Johnston, p.147
  3. ^ Johnston, p.296
  4. ^ Johnston, p.147
  5. ^ Johnston, Rev. James B., The Place-Names of England and Wales, London, 1915, p.147 [1]
  6. ^ Johnston, p.296
  7. ^ Johnston, p.196
  8. ^ Johnston, p.402