Crimen (film)

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Crimen
Crimen.jpg
Directed by Mario Camerini
Produced by Dino De Laurentiis
Written by Rodolfo Sonego, Luciano Vincenzoni
Starring Vittorio Gassman
Nino Manfredi
Alberto Sordi
Music by Pino Calvi
Cinematography Gianni Di Venanzo
Release date
13 December 1960
Running time
108 min
124 min (Italian cut)
Country Italy
Language Italian

Crimen (also known as ...And Suddenly It's Murder! and Killing in Monte Carlo) is a 1960 Italian whodunit-comedy movie by Mario Camerini.

The movie had two remakes: the first, Io non vedo, tu non parli, lui non sente, was directed by the same Camerini in 1971 and was starred by Gastone Moschin, Enrico Montesano and Alighiero Noschese, the second, Once Upon a Crime, was filmed in 1992 by Eugene Levy and has John Candy and James Belushi in the main roles.[1] It was also remade in Hindi titled 36 China Town[2][better source needed]

Plot[edit]

Five people, all united by the fact of being on a train to Monte Carlo, will find themselves being involved in the murder of an elderly millionaire of Dutch origin, a regular guest of the glamorous Riviera location. The bride and groom Remo and Marina, hairdressers, are attracted by the lure of fortune in gambling, with which they intend to start their own business, the Commander Alberto Franzetti, after a failed attempt to "detoxify" from the demon of gambling, is back in Monaco, where his wife is waiting for him (Dorian Gray), the pair of borgatari Quirino and Giovanna is committed to bring a dog to millionaire Dutch for the lucrative reward. The six main characters, for different reasons, are involved in the investigation and, all of them distrusting of the police, try to extricate themselves from the quandary by lying and rasing more and more suspicions on themselves. Thanks to the research of the Commissioner of Police (Bernard Blier) they will be acquitted in the end, while the real culprits will be exposed.

Cast[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pietro Piemontese. Remake: il cinema e la via dell'eterno ritorno. Castelvecchi, 2000. ISBN 88-8210-250-5. 
  2. ^ 36 China Town

External links[edit]