1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane

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1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane
1,1,1-trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane.svg
1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane 3D.png
Names
IUPAC name
1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane
Other names
CFC-113a
Freon 113a
Arcton 63
Freon-FT
1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane
1,1,1-Trichlorotrifluoroethane
1,1,1-Trifluoro-2,2,2-trichloroethane
1,1,1-Trifluorotrichloroethane
CF3CCl3
FC 113
FC133a
Precision cleaning agent
TF
T-WD602
Trichlorotrifluoroethane
FC 113a
2,2,2-Trichloro-1,1,1-trifluoro-ethane
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.005.968
EC Number 206-564-6
Properties
C2Cl3F3
Molar mass 187.376 g/mol
Density 1.579 g/mL[1][2]
Melting point 13–14 °C (55–57 °F; 286–287 K)
Boiling point 46 °C (115 °F; 319 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Trichlorotrifluoroethane, also called 1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane or CFC-113a is a chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). It has the formula Cl3C-CF3.

Environmental effects[edit]

Ozone depletion[edit]

It is one of four man-made chemicals newly discovered in the atmosphere by a team at the University of East Anglia, but CFC-113a is the only known CFC whose abundance in the atmosphere is still growing. CFC-113a seems to have been accumulating unabated since 1960, its source remains uncertain, but production of hydrofluorocarbons in East Asia is suspected by some. Between 2012 and 2017, concentrations of the gas jumped by 40 percent.[3][4][5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1,1,1-Trichlorotrifluoroethane". chemblink.com. Retrieved 10 March 2014. 
  2. ^ "Material Safety Data Sheet : 1,1,1-Trichlorotrifluoroethane". fishersci.com. Retrieved 10 March 2014. 
  3. ^ Adcock, Karina; Reeves, Claire; Gooch, Lauren; Leedham Elvidge, Emma; Ashfold, Matthew; Brenninkmeijer, Carl; Chou, Charles; Fraser, Paul; Langenfelds, Ray; Mohd Hanif, Norfazrin; O'Doherty, Simon; Oram, David; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Phang, Siew Moi; Samah, Azizan Abu; Röckmann, Thomas; Sturges, William; Laube, Johannes (9 April 2018). "Continued increase of CFC-113a (CCl3CF3) mixing ratios in the global atmosphere: emissions, occurrence and potential sources". Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. doi:10.5194/acp-18-4737-2018. Retrieved 17 April 2018. 
  4. ^ Laube, Johannes C.; Newland, Mike J.; Hogan, Christopher; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Fraser, Paul J.; Martinerie, Patricia; Oram, David E.; Reeves, Claire E.; Röckmann, Thomas; Schwander, Jakob; Witrant, Emmanuel; Sturges, William T. (9 March 2014). "Newly detected ozone-depleting substances in the atmosphere". Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2109. Retrieved 10 March 2014. 
  5. ^ McGrath, Matt. "Mysterious new man-made gases pose threat to ozone layer". BBC. Retrieved 10 March 2014.