Ribitol

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Ribitol
Ribitol structure.png
Names
IUPAC name
D-ribitol
Systematic IUPAC name
(2R,3s,4S)-Pentane-1,2,3,4,5-pentol
Other names
(2R,3s,4S)-Pentane-1,2,3,4,5-pentaol (not recommended)
Adonit
Adonite
Adonitol
Adonitrol
Pentitol
1,2,3,4,5-Pentanepentol
1,2,3,4,5-Pentanol
Pentane-1,2,3,4,5-pentol
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.006.987
KEGG
Properties
C5H12O5
Molar mass 152.15 g·mol−1
Melting point 102 °C (216 °F; 375 K)
-91.30·10−6 cm3/mol
Hazards
S-phrases (outdated) S22 S24/25
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
YesY verify (what is YesYN ?)
Infobox references

Ribitol or adonitol is a crystalline pentose alcohol (C5H12O5) formed by the reduction of ribose. It occurs naturally in the plant Adonis vernalis,[1] as well as in the cell walls of some Gram positive bacteria, in the form of ribitol phosphate, in teichoic acids.[2] It also forms part of the chemical structure of riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN), which is a nucleotide coenzyme used by many enzymes, the so-called flavoproteins.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Advances in Applied Microbiology. Academic Press. 1997-10-28. ISBN 9780080564586. 
  2. ^ Seltmann, Guntram; Holst, Otto (2013-03-09). The Bacterial Cell Wall. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 9783662048788. 
  3. ^ 1937-, Mathews, Christopher K., (2000). Biochemistry. Van Holde, K. E. (Kensal Edward), 1928-, Ahern, Kevin G. (3rd ed.). San Francisco, Calif.: Benjamin Cummings. p. 492. ISBN 0805330666. OCLC 42290721. 

External links[edit]