1,2,3-Trimethylbenzene

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1,2,3-Trimethylbenzene
Hemellitol.svg
1,2,3-Trimethylbenzene-3D-balls.png
Names
IUPAC name
1,2,3-Trimethylbenzene
Other names
Hemellitol; Hemimellitol, Hemimelithol; Hemimellitine; Hemimellitene
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.007.633
RTECS number DC3300000
Properties
C9H12
Molar mass 120.20 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid[1]
Density 0.89 g/mL[1]
Melting point −25 °C (−13 °F; 248 K)[1]
Boiling point 176 °C (349 °F; 449 K)[1]
0.006% (20°C)[2]
Vapor pressure 1 mmHg (16.7°C)[2]
Hazards
Main hazards Flammable[3]
R-phrases (outdated) R10 R37
S-phrases (outdated) S16
Flash point 51 °F (11 °C)[1]
470 °F (243 °C)[1]
Explosive limits 0.8%-6.6%[2]
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
none[2]
REL (Recommended)
TWA 25 ppm (125 mg/m3)[2]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
N.D.[2]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
YesY verify (what is YesYN ?)
Infobox references

1,2,3-Trimethylbenzene is an organic compound with the chemical formula C6H3(CH3)3. Classified as an aromatic hydrocarbon, it is a flammable colorless liquid, it is nearly insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents. It occurs naturally in coal tar and petroleum, it is one of the three isomers of trimethylbenzene. It is used in jet fuel, mixed with other hydrocarbons, to prevent the formation of solid particles which might damage the engine.

Production and uses[edit]

Industrially, it is isolated from the C9 aromatic hydrocarbon fraction during petroleum distillation. It is also generated by methylation of toluene and xylenes.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Record in the GESTIS Substance Database of the Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
  2. ^ a b c d e f "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0637". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 
  3. ^ CDC - NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
  4. ^ Karl Griesbaum, Arno Behr, Dieter Biedenkapp, Heinz-Werner Voges, Dorothea Garbe, Christian Paetz, Gerd Collin, Dieter Mayer, Hartmut Höke "Hydrocarbons" in Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry 2002 Wiley-VCH, Weinheim. doi:10.1002/14356007.a13_227