Bis(chloromethyl) ketone

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Bis(chloromethyl) ketone
1,3-Dichloroacetone.svg
1,3-Dichloro-2-propanone-3D-balls-by-AHRLS-2012.png
1,3-Dichloro-2-propanone-3D-sticks-by-AHRLS-2012.png
1,3-Dichloro-2-propanone-3D-vdW-by-AHRLS-2012.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
1,3-Dichloropropan-2-one
Other names
1,3-Dichloroacetone
α,α'-Dichloroacetone
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.007.806
Properties
C3H4Cl2O
Molar mass 126.96 g·mol−1
Hazards
Main hazards Extremely toxic. Dangerous to the skin and eyes
NFPA 704
Flammability code 1: Must be pre-heated before ignition can occur. Flash point over 93 °C (200 °F). E.g., canola oil Health code 4: Very short exposure could cause death or major residual injury. E.g., VX gas Reactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogen Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Bis(chloromethyl) ketone is a chemical substance with formula C
3
H
4
Cl
2
O
. It is a solid, and is used in the making of citric acid. Exposures such as contact or inhalation of bis(chloromethyl) ketone can result in irritation or damage to skin, eyes, throat, lungs, liver and kidneys, as well as headaches and fainting.[1]

Legal aspects[edit]

Bis(chloromethyl) ketone is a substance which is classified as an extremely hazardous substance in the United States as defined in Section 302 of the U.S. Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (42 U.S.C. 11002), and is subject to strict reporting requirements by facilities which produce, store, or use it in significant quantities.[2]

See Also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hazardous Substance Fact Sheet from the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services
  2. ^ "40 C.F.R.: Appendix A to Part 355—The List of Extremely Hazardous Substances and Their Threshold Planning Quantities" (PDF) (July 1, 2008 ed.). Government Printing Office. Retrieved October 29, 2011.