Hexadecanethiol

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Hexadecanethiol
1-hexadecaanthiol t.png
Names
IUPAC name
hexadecane-1-thiol
Other names
1-hexadecanethiol; hexadecane-1-thiol, hexadecyl mercaptan, 1-mercaptohexadecane, cetyl mercaptan
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.018.952
Properties
C16H34S
Molar mass 258.51 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Density 0,85 g/cm3
Melting point 18–20 °C (64–68 °F; 291–293 K)
Boiling point 334 °C (633 °F; 607 K)
Insoluble
Hazards
GHS pictograms The exclamation-mark pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word WARNING
Flash point 135 °C (275 °F; 408 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

1-Hexadecanethiol is a chemical compound from the group of thiols. Its chemical formula is C
16
H
34
S
.[1][2]

Synthesis[edit]

1-Hexadecanethiol can be obtained by reacting 1-bromohexadecane with thiourea.

Properties[edit]

1-Hexadecanethiol is a combustible colorless liquid with an unpleasant odor, which is practically insoluble in water.[3]

Applications[edit]

1-Hexadecanethiol is used as a synthesis chemical. The compound is also used for the production of nanoparticles and hydrophobic self-assembling monolayers, the high affinity of the thiol group to the elements of the copper group causes the thiols to spontaneously deposit in a high-order layer when a corresponding metal of a 1-hexadecanethiol solution is exposed.[4]

Toxicology and safety[edit]

The substance decomposes upon combustion with the formation of toxic gases, including sulfur oxides, it reacts violently with strong oxidizing agents, acids, reducing agents, and metals.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1-Hexadecanethiol". Sigma Aldrich. sigmaaldrich.com. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  2. ^ "1-Hexadecanethiol". NIST. webbook.nist.gov. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  3. ^ CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90. Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, 2009, ISBN 978-1-4200-9084-0, Section 3, Physical Constants of Organic Compounds, p. 3-306.
  4. ^ Desmyter, Etienne A.; Ferrell, William J.; Garces., Antonio (July 1976). "Synthesis and properties of 35S, 14C and 3H labeled S-alkyl glycerol ethers and derivatives". Chemistry and Physics of Lipids. 16 (4): 276–284. doi:10.1016/0009-3084(76)90022-0. Retrieved 9 June 2017.