10001 Palermo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
10001 Palermo
AnimatedOrbitOf10001Palermo.gif
Orbits of 10001 Palermo (blue), planets (red) and the Sun (black). The outermost planet visible is Jupiter
Discovery
Discovered by L. I. Chernykh
Discovery date 8 October 1969
Designations
MPC designation (10001) Palermo
Named after
Palermo
1969 TM1, 1991 RS27[1]
main belt
Orbital characteristics[1][2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 22264 days (60.96 yr)
Aphelion 2.6954856 AU (403.23891 Gm)
Perihelion 2.0574842 AU (307.79526 Gm)
2.3764849 AU (355.51708 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.1342321
3.66 yr (1338.1 d)
211.55508°
0° 16m 8.51s / day
Inclination 7.424880°
40.165043°
357.98565°
Earth MOID 1.06363 AU (159.117 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.71712 AU (406.475 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.518
Physical characteristics
Dimensions ~6 km
213.3679 h (8.89033 d)
Surface temp. min mean max
Kelvin
Celsius
13.9

10001 Palermo is an asteroid from the asteroid belt. Discovered on October 8, 1969, it was named "Palermo" after Palermo, the capital of Sicily where Giuseppe Piazzi made the first discovery of an asteroid, 1 Ceres.[3] The naming was made in January 2001 to honour the discovery of Ceres, as that was the 200th anniversary of that discovery.[4]

The asteroid is about six kilometers in radius, although it may be irregularly shaped, it orbits the Sun every 3.67 years.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "10001 Palermo (1969 TM1)". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 8 April 2016. 
  2. ^ AstDys
  3. ^ Citation for (10001). MPC 41937. Minor Planet Center. 
  4. ^ Chernykh, L. I. (September 2002). "Minor Planet(10001) is named Palermo". Memorie della Societa' Astronomica Italiana. 73 (3): 624. Bibcode:2002MmSAI..73..624C. 

External links[edit]