1006

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1006 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1006
MVI
Ab urbe condita 1759
Armenian calendar 455
ԹՎ ՆԾԵ
Assyrian calendar 5756
Balinese saka calendar 927–928
Bengali calendar 413
Berber calendar 1956
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1550
Burmese calendar 368
Byzantine calendar 6514–6515
Chinese calendar 乙巳(Wood Snake)
3702 or 3642
    — to —
丙午年 (Fire Horse)
3703 or 3643
Coptic calendar 722–723
Discordian calendar 2172
Ethiopian calendar 998–999
Hebrew calendar 4766–4767
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1062–1063
 - Shaka Samvat 927–928
 - Kali Yuga 4106–4107
Holocene calendar 11006
Igbo calendar 6–7
Iranian calendar 384–385
Islamic calendar 396–397
Japanese calendar Kankō 3
(寛弘3年)
Javanese calendar 908–909
Julian calendar 1006
MVI
Korean calendar 3339
Minguo calendar 906 before ROC
民前906年
Nanakshahi calendar −462
Seleucid era 1317/1318 AG
Thai solar calendar 1548–1549
Tibetan calendar 阴木蛇年
(female Wood-Snake)
1132 or 751 or −21
    — to —
阳火马年
(male Fire-Horse)
1133 or 752 or −20

Year 1006 (MVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • Granaries for famine relief are set up across China.

Europe[edit]

Oceania[edit]

  • A major eruption of the Mount Merapi volcano covers all of central Java with volcanic ash, causes devastation throughout central Java, and destroys a Hindu kingdom on the island of Java.[1]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Astronomy[edit]

  • May 1 – The brightest supernova ever recorded, SN 1006, occurs in the constellation of Lupus. It is observed and described in China, Japan, the Middle East, Europe, and elsewhere. The records of the event are suppressed in some western countries.[citation needed][2] The Supernova provides enough light to read by on a night with a dark moon.


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A history of Merapi". Retrieved 2007-02-20. 
  2. ^ "Astronomy Magazine".