100 Crore Club

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100 Crore Club is an unofficial designation by the Indian film trade and the media, related to Indian language films that have net 100 crore (1 billion Indian rupees) or more in India after deducting the entertainment tax.[1] By 2012, the 100 crore (US$16 million) box office target had become "a new benchmark for a film to be declared a hit",[2] and those affiliated with the 100 Crore Club were considered part of the "elite strata" within the Bollywood film community.[3] It was succeeded by the 1000 Crore Club in 2017.

History[edit]

The first Indian film to cross 100 crore worldwide was the 1982 Bollywood film Disco Dancer, directed by Babbar Subhash written by Rahi Masoom Raza, and starring Mithun Chakraborty, with over 90 crore grossed at the Soviet box office.[n 1][4] The first Indian film to gross over 100 crore domestically in India was the Salman Khan and Madhuri Dixit starrer Hum Aapke Hain Kaun (1994).[5][6] The 100 Crore Club emerged more than a decade later, when the Aamir Khan starrer Ghajini (2008) became the first Indian film to net over 100 crore domestically in India.[7] The later Aamir Khan films 3 Idiots (2009), Dhoom 3 (2013), PK (2014) and Dangal (2016) expanded the club to 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700 crore. Overseas, the first Indian film to gross 100 crore in international markets was the Shah Rukh Khan and Kajol starrer My Name is Khan (2010),[8] followed by 3 Idiots in 2011.[9][10]

When adjusted for inflation, the first Indian film to gross an adjusted 100 crore was the 1940 film Zindagi, directed by P.C. Barua and written by Javed Hussain.[n 2] The first Indian film to gross an adjusted 100 crore overseas was the 1951 film Awaara, directed by Raj Kapoor, written by Khwaja Ahmad Abbas, and starring Raj Kapoor and Nargis, becoming a blockbuster in the Soviet Union.[n 3]

In their annual awards for the year 2012, Zee Cine Awards added a category "The Power Club Box Office" to recognise directors whose films had reached the 100 crore mark,[11] the 100 Crore Club designation has replaced previous Bollywood indications of success which had included great music, the "Silver Jubilee"[12] or the "Diamond Jubilee" (films that ran for 75 weeks in theatres).[13] The concentration on reaching the club has been criticised, with actor and producer Arshad Warsi stating, "I find this whole Rs. 100 crore club very stupid. How can every film releasing lately do a business of Rs. 100 crores all of a sudden? Instead of this, we need to concentrate on making good films."[14]

The Hindustan Times claims that their magazine Brunch coined the term.[15] Initially the term applied only to the lead male actor.[1] Komal Nahta stated that "excluding women from the group is characteristic of an industry which exercises gender discrimination more than other industries."[1] By 2013, the usage had expanded to variously include the film itself, the director,[11] and the lead female actor.[16]

The 100 crore domestic box office became possible in part because of a steady rise in the ticket price, a tripling in the number of theaters and an increase in the number of prints of a film being released.[17] However, DNA reported that "Filmmakers and distributors too are known to leave no stone unturned in their attempt to cross over to the right side" of the 100 crore mark."[11] The Times of India cancelled its "Box Office" column in November 2013 because "The stakes of filmmakers have increased so much that they are willing to go any distance to manipulate and jack up their numbers to beat each other's records." and the Times felt they were no longer able to provide accurate enough figures because "Films that have not reached the '100 crore mark but are close will insist that they have reached the `100 crore figure as they can't resist being in the '100 crore club.'"[18]

Shahid Kapoor called the designation a "fad" which was leading to "massy films which are very basic in their understanding and high on entertainment. But if we run only to achieve those figures then we will restrict ourselves as actors"[2] On the other hand, Dibakar Banerjee, while agreeing with Kapoor about the impact on content stated, "I hope the club stays and grows to many more crores. Films as they do more business boost the confidence of audience and investors alike and everybody benefits."[19] Priyanka Chopra said that being part of films in the 100 Crore Club allowed her to also do less commercial "women oriented films", and lamented that as of December 2013 no woman oriented films had achieved the 100 Crore Club designation.[20]

Beyond Bollywood, the first South Indian film to gross over 100 crore worldwide was 2007 Rajinikanth starring Tamil film Sivaji.[21] The first Telugu film to enter the "100 Crore club" was 2009 film by S.S Rajamouli, Magadheera;[22] in May 2016, Sairat become the first Marathi film to gross over 100 crore (US$16 million) worldwide.[23] In 2016, Pulimurugan became the first Malayalam film to enter the club.[24]

Variations of the "Bollywood 100 Crore Club" came into use, such as the "Bollywood 400 Crore Club" when the Shah Rukh Khan film Chennai Express reported box office receipts of 400 crore in 2013,[25] and the "Tollywood 600 Crore Club", which relates to Telugu films that have earned over 650 crore (US$100 million) in 2015 film Baahubali: The Beginning.[26] They were eventually succeeded by the 1000 Crore Club, when Baahubali 2: The Conclusion and Dangal grossed over 1,000 crore (US$160 million) in 2017.

Milestones[edit]

See 1000 Crore Club for milestones beyond ₹1,000 crore.

Worldwide[edit]

Worldwide milestones
Nominal gross
Film Year Milestone Ref
Disco Dancer (1982) 1984 100 crore [n 1]
Hum Aapke Hain Kaun (1994) 1994 130 crore [33]
Dhoom 2 (2006) 2006 150 crore [34]
Ghajini (2008) 2008 200 crore [35]
3 Idiots (2009) 2009 300 crore [n 7]
2013 400 crore
Dhoom 3 (2013) 2013 500 crore [39]
2014 550 crore
PK (2014) 2014 600 crore [40]
2015 700 crore [41]
800 crore
Baahubali 2: The Conclusion (2017) 2017 900 crore [42]
1,000 crore
Dangal (2016) 2017 2,000 crore
Inflation adjusted gross
Film Year Milestone Ref
Zindagi (1940) 1940 100 crore (US$16 million) [n 2]
Khazanchi (1941) 1941 200 crore (US$31 million) [n 10]
Kismet (1943) 1943 300 crore (US$46 million) [n 12]
Jugnu (1947) 1947 350 crore (US$54 million) [n 14]
Awaara (1951) 1954 400 crore (US$62 million) [n 3]
500 crore (US$78 million)
600 crore (US$94 million)
700 crore (US$110 million)
Mother India (1957) 1957 800 crore (US$120 million) [n 17]
900 crore (US$140 million)
Mughal-e-Azam (1960) 1960 1,000 crore (US$160 million) [n 18]

Domestic[edit]

Domestic milestones
Nominal
Film Year Milestone Ref
Hum Aapke Hain Kaun 1994 100 crore (gross) [57]
120 crore (gross)
Ghajini 2008 100 crore (nett) [58]
110 crore (nett)
150 crore (gross)
3 Idiots 2009 200 crore (gross) [59]
200 crore (nett)
250 crore (gross)
Chennai Express 2013 300 crore (gross) [60]
Dhoom 3 2013 250 crore (nett) [61]
350 crore (gross) [62]
PK 2014 300 crore (nett) [61]
400 crore (gross) [62]
450 crore (gross)
Baahubali: The Beginning 2015 500 crore (gross) [63]
Dangal 2016 350 crore (nett) [61]
540 crore (gross) [62]
Baahubali 2: The Conclusion 2017 400 crore (nett) [64]
500 crore (nett)
600 crore (gross/nett) [42][65]
1,000 crore (gross/nett)
Inflation adjusted
Film Year Milestone Ref
Zindagi 1940 100 crore (US$16 million) (gross/nett) [n 2]
Khazanchi 1941 200 crore (US$31 million) (gross/nett) [n 10]
Kismet 1943 300 crore (US$46 million) (gross/nett) [n 12]
Jugnu 1947 350 crore (US$54 million) (gross/nett) [n 14]
Shree 420 1955 400 crore (US$62 million) (gross) [n 19]
Naya Daur 1957 500 crore (US$78 million) (gross) [n 20]
600 crore (US$94 million) (gross)
Mother India 1957 400 crore (US$62 million) (nett) [n 21]
450 crore (US$70 million) (nett)
700 crore (US$110 million) (gross) [n 17]
900 crore (US$140 million) (gross)
Mughal-e-Azam 1960 500 crore (US$78 million) (nett) [n 18]
700 crore (US$110 million) (nett)
900 crore (US$140 million) (nett)
1,000 crore (US$160 million) (gross/nett)

Overseas[edit]

Overseas milestones
Nominal gross
Film Year Milestone Ref
My Name is Khan (2010) 2010 100 crore [8]
3 Idiots (2009) 2011 120 crore [9]
2013 150 crore [n 7]
Dhoom 3 (2013) 2014 200 crore [n 22]
PK (2014) 2015 250 crore [41]
300 crore
Dangal (2016) 2017 400 crore [68]
500 crore
600 crore
1,000 crore
Inflation adjusted gross
Film Year Milestone Ref
Awaara (1951) 1954 100 crore (US$16 million) [n 3]
200 crore (US$31 million)
300 crore (US$47 million)
400 crore (US$62 million)
Char Dil Char Rahen (1959) 1962 500 crore (US$78 million) [n 25]
550 crore (US$86 million)
Mamta (1966) 1969 600 crore (US$94 million) [n 28]
Bobby (1973) 1975 600 crore (US$94 million) [n 32]
Disco Dancer (1982) 1984 700 crore (US$110 million) [n 1]
800 crore (US$120 million)
900 crore (US$140 million)
1,000 crore (US$160 million)
Dangal (2016) 2017 1,000 crore (US$160 million) [68]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Disco Dancer:
    • India: 6.4 crore[27] (US$6.54 million)[n 4] in 1982 (87 crore (US$14 million) in 2016)
    • Soviet Union: US$75.9 million[n 5] (94.34 crore)[n 6] in 1984 (US$175 million (1176 crore)[32] in 2016)
  2. ^ a b c 55 lakh[43] (US$1.58 million)[n 8] in 1940 (US$27 million or 181 crore[32] in 2016)
  3. ^ a b c Awaara: 5.75 crore (US$12.08 million) in 1954 (739 crore (US$110 million) in 2016)
  4. ^ 9.79 Indian rupees per US dollar in 1982[28]
  5. ^ Disco Dancer: 60 million Soviet rubles in 1984,[29] 0.791 rubles per US dollar in 1984[30]
  6. ^ 12.43 Indian rupees per US dollar in 1984[31]
  7. ^ a b 3 Idiots worldwide gross: 453.82 crore (US$87.55 million)
    • Domestic: 273.82 crore[36] (US$57.05 million)[37]
    • Overseas: US$30.5 million[8] (180 crore)[38]
  8. ^ 3.4804 Indian rupees per US dollar in 1940: 13.33 per pound,[44] $3.83 per pound[45]
  9. ^ 3.3077 Indian rupees per US dollar in 1941 and 1942: 13.33 per pound,[44] $4.03 per pound[45]
  10. ^ a b 70 lakh[46] (US$2.12 million)[n 9] in 1941 (US$35 million or 235 crore[32] in 2016)
  11. ^ 3.3223 Indian rupees per US dollar in 1943[48]
  12. ^ a b 1 crore[47] (US$3.32 million)[n 11] in 1943 (US$46 million or 309 crore[32] in 2016)
  13. ^ 1 Indian rupee per US dollar in 1947[50]
  14. ^ a b 50 lakh[49] (US$5 million)[n 13] in 1947 (US$54 million or 363 crore[32] in 2016)
  15. ^ a b c d e f g 4.7619 Indian rupees per US dollar from 1951 to 1965[52]
  16. ^ 4 Soviet rubles per US dollar from 1950 to 1960[30]
  17. ^ a b Mother India: 8 crore[54] (US$16.8 million)[n 15] in 1957 (US$143 million (961 crore)[32] in 2016)
  18. ^ a b Mughal-e-Azam domestic gross: 11 crore in 1960,[55] equivalent to 2,000 crore in 2017.
    • Inflation rate of 200 times: 6 crore domestic nett in 1960, equivalent to 1,300 crore (US$200 million) in 2017.[56]
  19. ^ Shree 420: 3.9 crore[66] (US$8.19 million)[n 15] in 1955 (US$73 million (490 crore)[32] in 2016)
  20. ^ Naya Daur domestic gross: 5.4 crore[54] (US$11.34 million)[n 15] in 1957 (US$97 million (652 crore)[32] in 2016)
  21. ^ Mother India net revenue: 4 crore[54] (US$8.4 million)[n 15] in 1957 (US$72 million (484 crore)[32] in 2016)
  22. ^ Dhoom 3 overseas gross: US$35.6 million,[8] 2.172 billion (equivalent to 2.6 billion or US$40 million in 2016)[67]
  23. ^ 39.8 million tickets sold,[69] average ticket price of 25 kopecks[70]
  24. ^ a b 0.9 Soviet rubles per US dollar from 1961 to 1971[71]
  25. ^ Char Dil Char Rahen in Soviet Union: 9.95 million SUR[n 23] (US$11.06 million,[n 24] 52.7 million)[n 15] in 1962[69] (US$88 million or 5.91 billion[32] in 2016)
  26. ^ 52.1 million tickets sold,[69] average ticket price of 25 kopecks[70]
  27. ^ 7.5 Indian rupees per US dollar from 1967 to 1970[52]
  28. ^ Mamta in Soviet Union: 13.025 million SUR[n 26] (US$14.47 million,[n 24] 108.5 million)[n 27] in 1969[69] (US$95 million or 6.38 billion[32] in 2016)
  29. ^ 62.6 million tickets sold,[69] average ticket price of 25 kopecks[70]
  30. ^ 0.73 Soviet rubles per US dollar in 1975[72]
  31. ^ 8.973 Indian rupees per US dollar in 1975[73]
  32. ^ Bobby in Soviet Union: 15.65 million SUR[n 29] (US$21.44 million,[n 30] 192.4 million)[n 31] in 1975 (US$95 million (6.38 billion)[32] in 2016)

References[edit]

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