Local bus routes in Western Sydney

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Regions 1, 2, 3 and 15
Western Sydney bus contract regions
NSW bus pictogram
Map of the four western bus regions for Sydney, Australia, with interchanges highlighted
Overview
System Transport for NSW
Operator
Livery Blue and white chevrons
Route
Locale Sydney, Australia
Communities served Western Sydney
Other routes
Service
Frequency 15–60 minutes[1]
Annual patronage 31.1 million[2]
Fare Opal fares apply
Timetable Trip planner
Map
Regions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15

The local bus routes of Western Sydney connect suburban destinations with major transport nodes Western Sydney, Australia. Local routes form one of three tiers in Sydney's bus network, complementing intermediate ("suburban") and strategic ("rapid") routes between major centres.

The local route network ensures that 90% of Sydneysiders are within 400 metres of a bus stop during daylight hours.[3] Transport for New South Wales, the state government agency that manages public transport, divides Western Sydney into four Sydney Metropolitan Bus Service Contract regions, from north to south:

Services in these regions evolved from routes created by small family-operated bus companies following World War I, though most were relegated to the status of railway feeder services after 1932.

Region 1: West of Blacktown[edit]

Region 1 is made up of 68 north-western Sydney bus routes covering the major centres[4] of Blacktown, Castle Hill, Marsden Park, Mount Druitt, Norwest Business Park, Penrith, RichmondWindsor, Rouse Hill and St Marys. The region's fleet consists of around 300 buses.[5]

The region's boundaries were defined by the then Ministry of Transport as part of a major consolidation in 2005. Three of the area's incumbents, Busways, Hawkesbury Valley Buses and Westbus, formed the Area 1 Management Company to jointly deliver the region's bus services. Unsworth's recommendation to open each region to competitive tendering[6] was not taken up until 2012, with Busways emerging alone as the successful bidder. Busways' new five-year Region 1 contract commenced in October 2013.[5][7]

All Region 1 routes are classified by Sydney's Bus Future as "local".[3] Major interchanges are located at Blacktown, Mount Druitt, Penrith, Windsor[8]

Together, Region 1 routes accounted for more than 12.5 million passenger journeys in the 12 months to October 2017.[2] Over the same period, Busways consistently exceeded its on-time running benchmark of 95%, placing it among Sydney’s best performing bus operators.[9]

Region 2: South-west of Liverpool[edit]

Region 2 is made up of 22 south-western Sydney bus routes covering the major centres[4] of Liverpool, Leppington, Narellan and Campbelltown. The region's fleet consists of around 100 buses.[10]

The region's boundaries were defined by the then Ministry of Transport as part of a major consolidation in 2005. Two of the area's incumbents, Busabout and Interline, formed the Area 2 Management Company to jointly deliver the region's bus services. Region 2 first went to competitive tender in 2013, with Interline emerging alone as the successful bidder. Interline's new five-year Region 2 contract commenced in July 2014.[10]

All Region 2 routes are classified by Sydney's Bus Future as "local".[3] Major interchanges are located at Glenfield, Ingleburn and Minto stations, and Prestons and Carnes Hill town centres.[11]

Together, Region 2 routes accounted for more than 3.6 million passenger journeys in the 12 months to October 2017.[2] Over the same period, Interline exceeded its on-time running benchmark of 95% in all but one month.[9]

Region 3: Fairfield City[edit]

Region 3 is made up of 32 south-western Sydney bus routes covering the major centres[4] of Blacktown, Fairfield, Liverpool, Parramatta and St Marys. The region's fleet consists of around 220 buses.[12]

The region's boundaries were defined by the then Ministry of Transport as part of a major consolidation in 2005. Five of the area's incumbents – Baxter's, Busabout, Hopkinsons, Metro-link and Westbus – formed the Area 3 Management Company to jointly deliver the region's bus services. Liverpool–Parramatta T-way services, which cross Region 3, remained with the Western Sydney Buses division of State Transit. The NSW Government put the region's services – including State Transit's T-way route – to tender in 2012 and a new entrant, Perth-based Transit Systems, emerged as the successful bidder. Transit Systems' new five-year Region 1 contract commenced in October 2013, marking the first time a government-operated bus route had been franchised.[13][7]

All Region 3 services are classified as "local" with the exception of T80, which forms part of a rapid route.[3] Major interchanges are located at Fairfield and Merrylands stations, and at Bonnyrigg and Wetherill Park T-way stations.[14]

Together, Region 3 routes accounted for more than 12 million passenger journeys in the 12 months to October 2017,[2] over the same period, Transit Systems consistently exceeded its on-time running benchmark of 95%, placing it among Sydney’s best performing bus operators.[9]

Region 15: Macarthur[edit]

Region 15 is made up of 34 bus routes in the Macarthur region, including the major centres[4] of CampbelltownMacarthur and Narellan. The region's fleet consists of around 100 buses.[10]

The region's boundaries were defined by the then Ministry of Transport as part of a major consolidation in 2005 and the operating contract was allocated to the area's then dominant operator, Busways. Region 15 first went to competitive tender in 2013. Busabout, until then a partner in separate consortia operating region 2 and 3 services, was the successful bidder, winning a new five-year contract starting in July 2014.[10]

All Region 15 routes are classified by Sydney's Bus Future as "local".[3] Major interchanges are located at Campbelltown Station, and the Camden and Narellan town centres.[15]

Together, Region 15 routes accounted for more than 3 million passenger journeys in the 12 months to October 2017, the lowest patronage of any metropolitan contract region,[2] over the same period, Busabout failed to meet its on-time running benchmark of 95% in all but three months, making it Sydney’s worst-performing private bus operator.[9]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Integrated Public Transport Service Planning Guidelines – Sydney Metropolitan Area (PDF). Transport for New South Wales. December 2013. p. 24–27. Retrieved 2017-11-30. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Bus patronage – monthly figures". Transport for NSW. Retrieved 9 December 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Sydney's bus future: simpler, faster, better bus services. Transport for New South Wales. December 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d Strategic centres identified by the Greater Sydney Commission
  5. ^ a b "Busways wins a 300-bus contract in Western Sydney". Busways. 7 November 2012. Retrieved 9 December 2017. 
  6. ^ Unsworth, Barrie (February 2004). Review of bus services in New South Wales – final report. Government of New South Wales. 
  7. ^ a b Cut costs or bus contracts will go to private sector, minister tells drivers Sydney Morning Herald 7 November 2012
  8. ^ "Region 1 bus network map" (PDF). Busways. 
  9. ^ a b c d "Bus on-time running". Transport for NSW. Retrieved 9 December 2017. 
  10. ^ a b c d Transport for NSW (28 August 2013). "More than 60 new buses and improved customer service with new bus contracts". 
  11. ^ "Region 2 bus network map" (PDF). Interline. 
  12. ^ Transit Systems Sydney Australian Bus Fleet Lists
  13. ^ Transit Systems awarded Sydney buses contract Transit Systems, 11 July 2012
  14. ^ "Region 3 bus network map" (PDF). Transit Systems. 
  15. ^ "Region 15 bus network map" (PDF). Busabout.