1016 Anitra

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1016 Anitra
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 31 January 1924
Designations
MPC designation (1016) Anitra
Named after
fictional character
in drama Peer Gynt[2]
1924 QG · 1929 TE1
main-belt · (inner)[3]
Flora[4]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 93.42 yr (34,123 days)
Aphelion|Aphelion 2.5035 AU
Perihelion|Perihelion 1.9356 AU
2.2196 AU
Eccentricity 0.1279
3.31 yr (1,208 days)
176.01°
0° 17m 53.16s / day
Inclination 6.0352°
8.8588°
53.320°
Known satellites 1[5][6]
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 9.539±0.078 km[7]
10.302±0.068 km[8]
12.97 km (calculated)[3]
5.928±0.001 h[9]
5.9288±0.0005 h[10]
5.929±0.001 h[11]
5.9295±0.0005 h[12]
5.92951 h[3]
5.9294±0.0001 h[6]
5.9300±0.0001 h[6]
5.930 h[13]
5.93 h[a]
5.9301±0.0003 h[14]
0.20 (assumed)[3]
0.2728±0.0572[8]
0.308±0.048[7]
SMASS = S[1] · S[3]
11.8[3] · 11.9[1] · 12.0[8]

1016 Anitra, provisional designation 1924 QG, is a stony Florian asteroid and suspected asynchronous binary system from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 10 kilometers in diameter.

It was discovered on 31 January 1924, by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at the Heidelberg-Königstuhl State Observatory in southwest Germany.[15] The asteroid was likely named after the fictional character Anitra from Henrik Ibsen's drama Peer Gynt.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Anitra is a member of the Flora family (402), a giant asteroid family and the largest family of stony asteroids in the main-belt.[4][16]:23

It orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.9–2.5 AU once every 3 years and 4 months (1,208 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.13 and an inclination of 6° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The asteroid's observation arc begins at Heidelberg, 12 days after to its official discovery observation.[15]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In the SMASS classification, Anitra is a common, stony S-type asteroid.[1]

Rotation period[edit]

In November 2015, a rotational lightcurve of Anitra was obtained from photometric observations by an international collaborations of astronomers who combined their observational results. Lightcurve analysis gave a rotation period of 5.92951 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.30 magnitude (U=3).[6]

Binary system[edit]

Anitra is a suspected asynchronous binary asteroid, a system with a fairly large separation, for which tidal forces have been insufficient to synchronize the periods within the system's lifetime.[5][6] The likely minor-planet moon has a rotation period of 2.609 hours and is thought to orbit its primary every 240 hours. The results, however, are still tentative.[3] More than 100 known binaries from the asteroid belt have already been discovered.

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the survey carried out by the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Anitra measures 9.539 and 10.302 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo of 0.2728 and 0.308, respectively.[7][8]

The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes an standard albedo for stony S-type asteroids of 0.20 and calculates a diameter of 12.97 kilometers based on an absolute magnitude of 11.8.[3]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was probably named after the Arabian dancer Anitra, daughter of a Bedouin chief in Henrik Ibsen's drama Peer Gynt, a five-act play in verse. The music was composed by Edvard Grieg who named one piece "Anitra's Dance",[2] the minor planets (4872) and (5696) are named after Grieg and Ibsen, respectively.[2]

The official naming citation is based on research by Lutz Schmadel and feedback from astronomers R. Bremer and I. van Houten-Groeneveld.[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Menke (2011) web: rotation period 5.93 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.50 magnitude and a quality code of 2. Summary figures at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1016 Anitra (1924 QG)" (2017-07-05 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1016) Anitra. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. pp. 87–88. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "LCDB Data for (1016) Anitra". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "Small Bodies Data Ferret". Nesvorny HCM Asteroid Families V3.0. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  5. ^ a b Johnston, Robert (16 July 2017). "(1016) Anitra". johnstonsarchive.net. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c d e Pilcher, Frederick; Benishek, Vladimir; Jacobsen, Jens; Kristensen, Leif Hugo; Lang, Kim; Larsen, Frank R.; et al. (July 2016). "Minor Planet 1016 Anitra: A Likely Asynchronous Binary". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (3): 274–277. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43..274P. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  8. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  9. ^ Pray, Donald P.; Galad, Adrian; Gajdos, Stefan; Vilagi, Jozef; Cooney, Walt; Gross, John; et al. (December 2006). "Lightcurve analysis of asteroids 53, 698, 1016, 1523, 1950, 4608, 5080 6170, 7760, 8213, 11271, 14257, 15350 and 17509". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 33 (4): 92–95. Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...92P. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  10. ^ Kryszczynska, A.; Colas, F.; Polinska, M.; Hirsch, R.; Ivanova, V.; Apostolovska, G.; et al. (October 2012). "Do Slivan states exist in the Flora family?. I. Photometric survey of the Flora region". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 546: 51. Bibcode:2012A&A...546A..72K. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219199. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  11. ^ Alkema, Michael S. (July 2013). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at Elephant Head Observatory: 2012 November - 2013 April". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 40 (3): 133–137. Bibcode:2013MPBu...40..133A. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  12. ^ Klinglesmith, Daniel K., III (October 2017). "Asteroids Observed from Estcorn Observatory". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 44 (4): 345–348. Bibcode:2017MPBu...44..345K. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 17 October 2017. 
  13. ^ Menke, John L. (September 2005). "Lightcurves and periods for asteroids 471 Papagena, 675 Ludmilla, 1016 Anitra, 1127 Mimi, 1165 Imprinetta, 1171 Rustahawelia, and 2283 Bunke". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 32 (3): 64–66. Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...64M. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  14. ^ Schmidt, Richard E. (April 2016). "NIR Minor Planet Photometry form Burleith Observatory, 2015". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (2): 129–131. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43..129S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  15. ^ a b "1016 Anitra (1924 QG)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  16. ^ Nesvorný, D.; Broz, M.; Carruba, V. (December 2014). "Identification and Dynamical Properties of Asteroid Families" (PDF). Asteroids IV: 297–321. arXiv:1502.01628Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015aste.book..297N. doi:10.2458/azu_uapress_9780816532131-ch016. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 

External links[edit]