1044 Teutonia

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1044 Teutonia
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 10 May 1924
Designations
MPC designation (1044) Teutonia
Named after
Land of the Teutons[2]
1924 RO · 1925 XF
1929 RP · 1949 KX
1954 UY1 · 1958 RG
1958 UP · A907 EE
main-belt · (middle)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 109.95 yr (40,158 days)
Aphelion|Aphelion 2.9470 AU
Perihelion|Perihelion 2.2044 AU
2.5757 AU
Eccentricity 0.1442
4.13 yr (1,510 days)
147.35°
0° 14m 18.24s / day
Inclination 4.2515°
59.962°
228.45°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 15.20±1.3 km[3]
15.30 km (derived)[4]
16.85±0.61 km[5]
17.511±0.213 km[6]
17.929±0.192 km[7]
2.84±0.04 h[8]
3.140±0.0010 h[9]
3.153±0.003 h[10]
3.157±0.001 h[11]
3.158±0.001 h[12]
3.18±0.02 h[10]
0.2449±0.0196[7]
0.251±0.049[6]
0.273±0.021[5]
0.3340±0.063[3]
0.3613 (derived)[4]
S[4]
10.533±0.002 (R)[9] · 10.8[1][4] · 10.9[3][5][7]

1044 Teutonia, provisional designation 1924 RO, is a stony asteroid from the central regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 16 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 10 May 1924, by astronomer Karl Reinmuth at Heidelberg Observatory in southwest Germany,[13] the asteroid was named after the land inhabited by the Teutonic people.[2]

Classification and orbit[edit]

Teutonia orbits the Sun in the central main-belt at a distance of 2.2–2.9 AU once every 4 years and 2 months (1,510 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.14 and an inclination of 4° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

The asteroid's observation arc begin 17 years prior to its official discovery observation, with its first identification as A907 EE at Taunton Observatory (803) in March 1907.[13]

Physical characteristics[edit]

Lightcurves[edit]

Images of the object made during 2007 were used to produce a light curve that gave a synodic period of 2.84 ± 0.04 h. However, a study made in 2006 gave a period of 3.153 ± 0.003, which can not yet be ruled out. The brightness of the object varied by 0.20 ± 0.03 in magnitude over the course of each rotation.[8]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the surveys carried out by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRAS, the Japanese Akari satellite, and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, Teutonia measures between 15.20 and 17.929 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo between 0.2449 and 0.3340.[3][5][6][7] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link derives an albedo of 0.3613 and a diameter of 15.30 kilometers based on an absolute magnitude of 10.8.[4]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named for the land once inhabited by the Teutons, a Germanic tribe that lived in what is now Jutland, the name was proposed by astronomer Gustav Stracke.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1044 Teutonia (1924 RO)" (2017-02-24 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1044) Teutonia. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 89. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (1044) Teutonia". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  8. ^ a b Betzler, Alberto Silva; Ferreira, Diogo Henrique; Dos Santos, Tarcio Henrique Ribeiro; Novaes, Alberto Brum (March 2008). "Lightcurve and Rotation Period of 1044 Teutonia". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 35 (1): 26. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...26B. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  9. ^ a b Waszczak, Adam; Chang, Chan-Kao; Ofek, Eran O.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank; Levitan, David; et al. (September 2015). "Asteroid Light Curves from the Palomar Transient Factory Survey: Rotation Periods and Phase Functions from Sparse Photometry". The Astronomical Journal. 150 (3): 35. arXiv:1504.04041Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015AJ....150...75W. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/75. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  10. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1044) Teutonia". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  11. ^ Klinglesmith, Daniel A., III; Hanowell, Jesse; Risley, Ethan; Turk, Janek; Vargas, Angelica; Warren, Curtis Alan (July 2014). "Lightcurves for Inversion Model Candidates". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 41 (3): 139–143. Bibcode:2014MPBu...41..139K. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  12. ^ Klinglesmith, Daniel A., III (January 2017). "Asteriod Photometry Results from Etscorn Observatory". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 44 (1): 69–72. Bibcode:2017MPBu...44...69K. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  13. ^ a b "1044 Teutonia (1924 RO)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 

External links[edit]